scintillation

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scintillation

 [sin″tĭ-la´shun]
1. the emission of sparks.
2. the sensation of sparks before the eyes.
3. a particle emitted in disintegration of a radioactive element.

scin·til·la·tion

(sin'ti-lā'shŭn),
1. Flashing or sparkling; a subjective sensation as of sparks or flashes of light.
See also: scintillation counter.
2. In radiation measurement, the light produced by an ionizing event in a phosphor, as in a crystal or liquid scintillator.
See also: scintillation counter.
[L. scintilla, a spark]

scintillation

/scin·til·la·tion/ (sin″tĭ-la´shun)
1. an emission of sparks.
2. a subjective visual sensation, as of seeing sparks.
3. a particle emitted in disintegration of a radioactive element; see also under counter.

scin·til·la·tion

(sin'ti-lā'shŭn)
1. Flashing or sparkling; a subjective sensation as of sparks or flashes of light.
2. In radiation measurement, the light produced by an ionizing event in a phosphor, as in a crystal or liquid scintillator.
See also: scintillation counter
[L. scintilla, a spark]

Scintillation or gamma camera

A camera, somewhat like an x-ray machine, used to photograph internal organs after the patient has been injected with a radioactive material.

scintillation

1. the emission of sparks.
2. a particle emitted in disintegration of a radioactive element.

scintillation camera
a stationary device that records a photographic image of the distribution of radioactivity of an organ after the administration of a radionuclide. A sequence of photographs records the uptake and the distribution of the radionuclide.
scintillation counter
see scintillation counter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Current receivers are not designed for a scintillating environment nor are their performance evaluated in the presence of scintillations.
Finally, remember that GPS signal scintillations are not the only space weather effect on GPS signals.
Each neutron capture event produces a scintillation pulse; the scintillation rate thus becomes a measure of the angle between the polarization vectors.
In fact, she says, the day side of the Martian ionosphere may show such scintillations all the time.
The electron calorimeter will use a material in which the particles manifest their presence by producing scintillations of light.
Both scintillation and semiconductor radiation detection materials are covered in this report in which we show how improving costs and performance is helping to increase the addressable markets for these materials.
2 Scintillation Radiation Detection Materials and Applications