scientism

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scientism

(sī′ən-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. The collection of attitudes and practices considered typical of scientists.
2. The belief that the investigative methods of the physical sciences are applicable or justifiable in all fields of inquiry.

sci′en·tis′tic adj.

scientism

(1) The belief that the methods used in the investigation of phenomena in the physical universe can be applied to all areas of research, including the cognitive sciences.  
(2) The use of scientific methods and principles for inappropriate topics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientistic argument included distinctions and references to blastocysts and spare embryos (from in vitro fertilization) as ways to treat the embryonic stem cell sources as thing-like.
Pragmatic conservatism views all inquiry as an ongoing experiment, though experiment not in some narrow scientistic sense but in the broadest possible humanistic and spiritual sense.
It is odd, given his professed scientistic tendencies, for Herskovits to have rather uncritically accepted their data as evidence of African cultural survivals when they were writing with such (differing) political purposes in mind.
focus of scientistic, materialistic Britain" (149).
the social sciences have not been thwarted in their development by the resistance of humans to being treated as objects, but by their complacence about scientistic research programmes which make it more difficult for the social scientists to quickly detect the artifacts of the design in the case of humans than in the case of non-humans.
While the book is thus relevant for economists, political scientists, and sociologists alike, it challenges all forms of "economistic functionalism, scientistic determinism, and agency-free structuralism" (p.
On the other hand, there are aspects of the professional conversation--notably its systematic scientistic and statist prejudices--that they recognize as harmful both to understanding and to human well-being (Hayek, 1952).
26) Is thinking like this scientistic hyperbole, or are we obligated to over come limitations imposed upon us by our genes and our environment?
of Brighton, UK), which argues for avoiding either a scientistic approach that fails to take into account the human element and is therefore overly constraining or post-modern approaches that amount to a form of truth-denial.
If the scientistic determinacy of the disciplines and bio-power had to enable their own dictates without the force and cohesion endowed on them by sovereign and law, their determinacy too would dissipate.
Percy believed, of course, that in modern Western culture, society was largely dominated by the C-2 consciousness of a bankrupt scientistic perspective.
Van Manen (2000) laments, "The most unfortunate fact about contemporary discourses and practices of education is that they have tended to become overly rationalistic, scientistic, corporatist, managerial, and narrowly results-based" (p.