scientism


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scientism

(sī′ən-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. The collection of attitudes and practices considered typical of scientists.
2. The belief that the investigative methods of the physical sciences are applicable or justifiable in all fields of inquiry.

sci′en·tis′tic adj.

scientism

(1) The belief that the methods used in the investigation of phenomena in the physical universe can be applied to all areas of research, including the cognitive sciences.  
(2) The use of scientific methods and principles for inappropriate topics.
References in periodicals archive ?
18) Though not a military theorist per se, Hayek's insights into the use of knowledge, function of complex systems, and dangers of scientism all offer important lessons for the contemporary strategist, planner, and student of military theory.
Second, the book is heavy on the critique of reductive scientism but much lighter on the development of positive alternatives.
The halo of evolutionism or scientism suggests that human history arose from nature and that science has "a prophetic role in liberal democracy.
Thus it is clear that although Rao accepts scientism in parapsychology, he is not a naive inductivist or someone who blindly accepts the outmoded hypothetico-deductive "received view" of science.
The inhumanity is often marked by political suppression, economic autocracy, and a governance of scientism.
Not only do Strauss's followers reject the excessive scientism which Mahbubani describes in favor of the study of canonical texts, but they also reject the idea of an entirely "Western" canon in favor of the study of great works produced in a variety of cultural contexts, including Islamic ones.
22) Scientism embodied the notion that there were no limits to the cognitive capacities of positivist methodology and technical analysis.
s presentation of Galileo is banal; he says too little about Benedict XIV; and he ignores the way Leo XIII differentiated between science and scientism.
In the face of the polarizing scientism advocated by Dawkins and others, is it possible to envision and defend a science that is compatible with faith?
He shows prowess in the religion and science dialogue by critically analyzing certain scientific thinkers, as shown in the statement, "As so often happens, Freud moves from a scientific method to scientism without fully acknowledging that he has switched an empirical hat for a metaphysical one.
Science and Scientism in Nineteenth-Century Europe, by Richard G.