scientism


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scientism

(sī′ən-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. The collection of attitudes and practices considered typical of scientists.
2. The belief that the investigative methods of the physical sciences are applicable or justifiable in all fields of inquiry.

sci′en·tis′tic adj.

scientism

(1) The belief that the methods used in the investigation of phenomena in the physical universe can be applied to all areas of research, including the cognitive sciences.  
(2) The use of scientific methods and principles for inappropriate topics.
References in periodicals archive ?
7) Scientism has blossomed in the West during the last three centuries.
In his marvelous work Science and Scientism in Nineteenth-Century Europe (2007), reviewed earlier in this journal, Richard G.
No amount of scientism wrapped in piety by certain contemporary Muslims can prevent Ibn Sinan philosophy, including his philosophy of nature, from remaining as a very important component of the still living Islamic intellectual tradition.
Also, existing institutions aimed at harmonizing these human enterprises should be augmented by an organization that calls attention to places where science becomes scientism and that likewise provides opportunity for free discussion of all issues that seem to set science and religion in opposition.
Matter is self-ordering and contingent and so need not rely on anything other than the laws of nature that scientism has laid down.
Since then, although conditions have changed, scientism has remained popular.
The book discusses science and scientism, and belief and knowledge.
We lead with Robert Boenig's plenary address from Myth con 47, on the character of the "Materialist Magician" (Screwtape's term) in Tolkien and Lewis--the Janus-like figure who looks backwards to magic and forwards to scientism, without the moral core to reconcile his liminality.
Maybe if we had gotten a grant we could have paid for scientism studies to prove its effectiveness and then with the help of a marketing consultant rebranded it as "Jeannefulness.
For decades, philosophy in English-speaking countries has been dominated by various forms of scientism such as linguistic analysis and logical positivism.
Hegel, Rousseau, Comte, and of course Karl Marx did a great deal of pen-wielding to arrest this development and one of their most potent weapons has been to link the ideals of a fully free society to the flaws of scientism and one of its products, subjective or narrow individualism.
It is a book that deftly deconstructs scientism on one hand and religious fundamentalism on the other.