science


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sci·ence

(sī'ents),
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]

science

/sci·ence/ (si´ens)
1. the systematic observation of natural phenomena for the purpose of discovering laws governing those phenomena.
2. the body of knowledge accumulated by such means.scientif´ic

science

(sī′əns)
n.
1.
a. The observation, identification, description, experimental investigation, and theoretical explanation of phenomena: new advances in science and technology.
b. Such activities restricted to a class of natural phenomena: the science of astronomy.
2. A systematic method or body of knowledge in a given area: the science of marketing.

science

[sī′əns]
Etymology: L, scientia, knowledge
a systematic attempt to establish theories to explain observed phenomena and the knowledge obtained through these efforts. Pure science is concerned with the gathering of information solely for the sake of obtaining new knowledge. Applied science is the practical application of scientific theory and laws. See also hypothesis, law, scientific method, theory.

science

Vox populi The formal and systematic study of natural phenomena. See Big science, Fraud in science, Little science, Junk science, Misconduct in science, Prediction science, Pseudoscience.

sci·ence

(sī'ĕns)
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]
References in classic literature ?
So, one after another, this notable company of men listened to the voice of the first telephone, and the more they knew of science, the less they were inclined to believe their ears.
Also, he was the translator of the famous book on "The Sensations of Tone," written by Helmholtz, who, in the period from 1871 to 1894 made Berlin the world-centre for the study of the physical sciences.
Unless all my science have deceived me, it cannot fail.
Mingled with this mood, however, was the philosophic investigation characteristic of the man of science.
An idealistic monist who long puzzled the philosophers of that time with his denial of the existence of matter, but whose clever argument was finally demolished when the new empiric facts of science were philosophically generalized.
We may attempt to shake them off, but they are always returning, and in every sphere of science and human action are tending to go beyond facts.
From that day forward Impey Barbicane became one of the greatest citizens of the United States, a kind of Washington of science.
Such was the chateau in which science had taken refuge--a place seemingly designed to be the theatre of mysteries, terror, and death.
Such prolonged ancient fear, at last become subtle, spiritual and intellectual--at present, me thinketh, it is called SCIENCE.
If psychology is to be a separate science at all, we must seek a wider ground for its separateness than any that we have been considering hitherto.
If, instead of this remark, my father had taken the pains to explain to me that the principles of Agrippa had been entirely exploded and that a modern system of science had been introduced which possessed much greater powers than the ancient, because the powers of the latter were chimerical, while those of the former were real and practical, under such circumstances I should certainty have thrown Agrippa aside and have contented my imagination, warmed as it was, by returning with greater ardour to my former studies.
And thought I was lost," continued the man of science too much bent on his own ideas, to understand her interruption.