school readiness


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school readiness

An educational milestone in the development of a child, experienced when he or she is independent and mature enough to listen, work, and play in a structured learning environment.
See also: readiness
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The SADoBE introduced the kindergarten or Grade R year in an attempt to improve school readiness and to eliminate possible deficits (Chisholm, 2005).
We draw from the work of Meisels (1999) and his four conceptions of school readiness to frame this debate.
School readiness interventions that have demonstrated impacts into adolescence and adulthood are typically intensive and long term (i.
In a study examining the views of 3,000 kindergarten teachers, Lin, Lawrence, and Gorrell (2003) found that the teachers' concerns in regard to school readiness centered on children's social skills and self-regulation behaviors (henceforth referred to as socioemotional skills) in schools (communicates wants and thoughts, 83.
As a result, they may improve their children's diets, promote physical activity, arrange more social activity and avoid environmental toxins, all of which may be associated with cognitive development and the social skills that are evaluated in the school readiness assessment.
A number of factors have contributed to growing state and national interest in promoting early learning and development as one way of preventing school readiness gaps.
Relatively little, however, is known about the school readiness of children whose development may be compromised not only by poverty but also by developmental disabilities or biological risks.
In addition, Gullo and Barton (1992) found that age, years of preschool experience, and the interaction between age and years of preschool all contributed significantly to children's school readiness at the end of kindergarten.
States that monitor school readiness of kindergarten children in aggregate statewide can use the data to inform policy and investment decisions.
The authors conclude that, while the findings demonstrate the risk of neonatal morbidities in determining school readiness, lower socioeconomic status plays a far greater role than biomedical risks.
Increasingly, city leaders are recognizing that by providing all young children--including those who are most difficult to reach--with quality early learning experiences, they can promote school readiness, strengthen families and help close achievement gaps.
With growing recognition of the importance of early education, interest in the topic of school readiness has increased among researchers, policy makers, and educators.

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