schizoid

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Related to schizoids: schizoid personality

schizoid

 [skiz´oid, skit´soid]
1. the traits of shyness, sensitivity, social withdrawal, and introversion that characterize a person with schizoid personality disorder.
2. a term used loosely to refer to any of a variety of characteristics related to schizophrenia, including schizophrenia-like traits said to indicate a predisposition to schizophrenia as well as any disorder other than schizophrenia either occurring in a relative of a schizophrenic or occurring more commonly than average in families of schizophrenics.
schizoid personality disorder a personality disorder marked by withdrawal from social relationships and a restricted range of emotional experience and expression. An individual with a schizoid personality lacks the capacity for, or interest in, social relationships, is cold and aloof, consistently prefers solitary activities, appears to take pleasure in few activities, and is indifferent to praise, criticism, or the feelings of others. Such a person does not, however, show the eccentricities of speech or behavior found in the schizotypal personality disorder.

schiz·oid

(skiz'oyd),
Socially isolated, withdrawn, having few (if any) friends or social relationships; resembling the personality features characteristic of schizophrenia, but in a milder form.
See also: schizoid personality.
[schizo(phrenia), + G. eidos, resemblance]

schizoid

/schiz·oid/ (skit´soid)
1. denoting the traits that characterize the schizoid personality.
2. denoting any of a variety of schizophrenia-related characteristics, including traits said to indicate a predisposition to schizophrenia as well as disorders other than schizophrenia either occurring in a relative of a schizophrenic or occurring more commonly than average in families of schizophrenics.

schizoid

(skĭt′soid′)
adj.
1. Of, related to, or having schizoid personality disorder.
2. Of, relating to, or suggestive of schizophrenia. No longer in scientific use.
3. Informal Relating to or characterized by the coexistence of disparate or antagonistic elements: "This schizoid town is part resort, part sardine cannery" (Jean Anderson).
n. Informal
A person with schizoid personality disorder.

schizoid

[skit′soid, skiz′oid]
Etymology: Gk, schizein, to split, eidos, form
1 adj, characteristic of or resembling schizophrenia; schizophrenic.
2 n, a person, not necessarily a schizophrenic, who exhibits the traits of a schizoid personality.

schiz·oid

(skiz'oyd)
1. Socially isolated, withdrawn, having few (if any) friends or social relationships.
2. Resembling the personality features characteristic of schizophrenia, but in a milder form.
See also: schizoid personality
[schizo(phrenia), + G. eidos. resemblance]

schiz·oid

(skits'oyd)
Socially isolated, having few (if any) friends or social relationships.
References in periodicals archive ?
The schizoid manner is flat and unresponsive because there is virtually no emotionality to speak of and, besides, whatever emotions there may be in the borderline cases, the schizoid does not have the instruments to express--or doesn't know how to handle--them.
This behaviour clearly departs from the schizoid pattern, according to which they "appear indifferent to the praise or criticism of others (DSM-5: 653): their peers' praise for their success --and equally for their failure--is not relevant to them; in other words "they are not particularly susceptible to loss of self-esteem or self-deprecation" (Millon 2007: 53).
The hypothesis that the detective clusters features possibly indicating a form--and degree--of personality disorder, namely the schizoid one, was meant to provide ground for an overall explanation of the behavioural pattern and traits of the hero.
Accordingly, the shortened N1 latency and enhanced N2 amplitude might indicate that the schizoid subjects were highly aroused.
Resembling schizophrenia, both schizoid and paranoid groups showed reduced P3 amplitude in the present study, implying that they had impaired passive attention.
The abnormal ERP components were confined to the schizoid and paranoid groups only, instead of a generalization to other groups including schizotypal, antisocial, and borderline.
Thirdly, the sample size of our schizoid patients (n = 11) was small; the present finding needs further confirmation from other independent laboratories.
In conclusion, patients with schizoid personality disorder displayed higher vigilance, both schizoid and paranoid patients exhibited impaired passive attention, and none of these findings were correlated with either depression or Axis I anxiety symptoms.