schistocyte


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Related to schistocyte: target cell, microspherocyte, burr cell

schistocyte

 [shis´-, skis´to-sīt]
a fragment of an erythrocyte, commonly observed in the blood in hemolytic anemia; called also helmet cell and schizocyte.

schis·to·cyte

(skis'tō-sīt),
A variety of poikilocyte that owes its abnormal shape to fragmentation occurring as the cell flows through damaged small vessels.
Synonym(s): schizocyte
[schisto- + G. kytos, cell]

schistocyte

/schis·to·cyte/ (shis´-) (skis´to-sīt) burr cell; a fragment of an erythrocyte, commonly observed in the blood in hemolytic anemia.

schistocyte

(shĭs′tə-sīt′)
n.
A red blood cell having an abnormal shape as a result of fragmentation that occurs as the cell flows through damaged small vessels.

schistocyte

[shis′təsīt]
Etymology: Gk, schistos, cleft, kytos, cell
an erythrocyte cell fragment characteristic of hemolysis or cell fragmentation associated with severe burns, microangiopathic hemolytic anemias, and intravascular coagulation. Also called schizocyte.
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Schistocyte

schistocyte

A fragmented red cell which arises from either an intrinsic increase in cell fragility or due to intravascular rugosities that traumatise cells; schistocytes are a nonspecific finding seen in hemolysis, trauma, prosthetic heart valves, megaloblastic and microangiopathic anaemioccidianhemolytic uremic syndrome, TTP.

ker·a·to·cyte

(ker'ă-tō-sīt)
1. The fibroblastic stromal cell of the cornea.
2. A variety of poikilocyte that owes its abnormal shape to fragmentation occurring as the cell flows through damaged small vessels.
Synonym(s): schistocyte.

schistocyte

(skis'to-sit) [? + kytos, cell]
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SCHISTOCYTE: In peripheral blood (×600)
A fragmented red blood cell that appears in the blood in a variety of bizarre shapes, from small triangular forms to round cells with irregular surfaces. Schistocytes are found in patients with hemolytic anemias, severe burns, and several other conditions. Synonym: schizocyte See: illustration
illustration

schistocyte

a fragment of an erythrocyte, commonly observed in the blood in hemolytic anemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The diagnosis of TTP was distinguished from haemolytic anaemia related to her CTD by means of the profuse presence of schistocytes on peripheral smear, normal complement levels and negative Coombs test.
She had clear-cut evidence of microangiopathic hemolysis with abundant schistocytes on peripheral blood smear, elevated serum bilirubin, elevated lactic dehydrogenase, moderate reticulocytosis, and undetectable serum haptoglobin levels.
Intraluminal schistocytes (gastrointestinal biopsies from high-risk transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy patients).
Laboratory findings may include abnormal urinalysis findings (proteinuria, hematuria, or casts), schistocytes on blood smear, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased BUN and creatinine, hyperkalemia, and coagulation study results within reference intervals.
The blood film showed schistocytes and fragmented red cells and a diagnosis of TTP was first considered.
05 -- Peripheral Schistocytes -- -- -- No Smear Schistocytes
Although no schistocytes were evident on peripheral blood smear, the internist was concerned and consulted a nephrologist at a nearby regional hospital.
A peripheral blood smear showed marked burr cells, reticulocytes, and a few schistocytes, at least one per high power field.
Laboratory findings include anemia with schistocytes on peripheral blood smear, thrombocytopenia, elevated indirect bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH).
Therefore, TAM should be defined according to the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) Toxicity Committee of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) as follows: (1) RBC fragmentation and [greater than or equal to] 2 schistocytes per high-power field on peripheral blood smear, (2) concurrent increased serum LDH levels above institutional baseline, (3) concurrent renal (doubling of serum creatinine compared to the value before hydration and conditioning) and/or neurological dysfunction without other explanation, and (4) negative direct and indirect Coombs test results [39].
Intravascular hemolysis is diagnosed with laboratory studies that show anemia, low haptoglobin, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, and blood smear schistocytes.
2,3) As most TTP patients do not display all five criteria at presentation, the combination of thrombocytopenia, anemia, and the presence of schistocytes on the blood smear must often be presumed to be due to TTP if other causes of such findings, such as DIC or the HELLP syndrome, can be clinically excluded.