scheduled purpose

scheduled purpose

A term of art used in the context of the UK’s Human Tissue Act 2004 referring to those uses of body parts, organs and tissue from the living or the deceased, including removal, specified health-related purposes and public display, which are allowed by law, assuming appropriate consent from the living or the deceased (or their next of kin) has been given.

Human Tissue Act (2004), scheduled purposes
Part 1—Removal, storage and use of human organs and other tissue for scheduled purposes
Consent requirement applies to relevant material from living or deceased:
• Anatomical examination;
• Determining the cause of death (exception where ordered by a Coroner);
• Establishing after a person's death the efficacy of any drug or other treatment administered;
• Obtaining scientific or medical information about a living or deceased person which may be relevant to any other person (including a future person);
• Public display;
• Research in connection with disorders or the functioning of the human body;
• Transplantation.

Part 2—Regulation of activities involving human tissue
 Consent requirement applies to relevant material from the deceased only:
• Clinical audit;
• Education or training relating to human health (includes training in research techniques);
• Performance assessment (e.g. testing medical devices);
• Public health monitoring;
• Quality assurance.
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The scheduled purpose for Obama's long-planned trip to the Netherlands was the two-day Nuclear Security Summit, an international forum the president created during his first term that focuses on eliminating or securing the world's nuclear materials.
It adds: 'The position of the child who, before they died, was competent to reach a decision and gave their consent for one or more of the scheduled purposes to take place following his/her death, is no different from that of an adult.