scatter

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scatter

 [skat´er]
the diffusion or deviation of x-rays produced by a medium through which the rays pass.
back scatter backward diffusion of x-rays.

scat·ter

(skat'ĕr),
1. A change in direction of a photon or subatomic particle, as the result of a collision or interaction.
2. The secondary radiation resulting from the interaction of primary radiation with matter.

scat·ter

(skat'ĕr)
1. A change in direction of a photon or subatomic particle, as the result of a collision or interaction.
2. The secondary radiation resulting from the interaction of primary radiation with matter.

scat·ter

(skat'ĕr)
1. Change in direction of a photon or subatomic particle due to collision or interaction.
2. Secondary radiation due to interaction of primary radiation with matter.

scatter

1. the diffusion or deviation of x-rays produced by a medium through which the rays pass.
2. the distribution of two variables in relation to each other, e.g. the numbers of a population in terms of time, place or any other variable.

back scatter
backward diffusion of x-rays.
scatter diagram
a graphic representation of a scatter of two variables.
scatter radiation
the scattering of radiation in all directions as a result of interaction between the beam of the x-ray and the patient. See also compton effect.
References in periodicals archive ?
The form of scatter diagram on standard 2-simplex plane also provided a visualization method for analyzing scattering mechanisms of the model-based decomposition.
As shown in Figure 10(c), there is a trough between the fast and slow scatters of the VV polarized spectrum, which is caused by the deviation of the simulated vertical motion with the real sea surface.
Although the frequency shifts of the fast and slow scatters both increase with the incidence angle, the increment from fast scatter is much larger.
For reference, the frequency shifts of the fast and slow scatters are shown in Table 1.
The Rayleigh ratio, R[theta], represents the relative ratio of the scattered light, taking the angle of scatter and the distance of the observer from the scattering particles into consideration, and it is directly proportional to I/[I.
4]; thus, the solution of particles will scatter light with an intensity more than ninefold greater for violet (400 nm) than for red (700 nm) light (5).
Both VLDL and chylomicrons effectively scatter light, causing turbidity.
By that definition, a sheet of perfect absorber scatters exactly the same amount of power it absorbs, as a forward scattered field that is the negative of the incident field is required to provide the shadow region behind the sheet.
Although this example is the worst case (it assumes no absorption of incident power in the antenna load), it does indicate the potential magnitude of the problem presented to the radar cross section reduction (RCSR) designer by antenna scatter.
Those two components of antenna scatter have historically been called structural mode and antenna mode scattering.
Tiny air bubbles distributed throughout the glass scatter the laser light in all directions, producing a kind of interference pattern -- consisting of an apparently random distribution of bright and dark speckles -- where the beam emerges.
By analyzing in detail how a foam scatters light, they have obtained the first direct, noninvasive measure of the average size of bubbles deep inside a foam.