scattering

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scattering

 [skat´er-ing]
a change in the direction of motion of a photon or subatomic particle as the result of a collision or interaction.

scattering

Etymology: ME, scateren
a change in the direction of photons caused by the interaction between photons and matter. In coherent scattering, an incident photon interacts with matter and excites an atom, causing it to vibrate. The vibration causes the photon to scatter. Also called Thompson scattering, unmodified scattering. In Compton scattering an incident photon interacts with an orbital electron, transferring some of its energy to that electron. The electron is ejected, and the photon is scattered.

scattering

a change in the direction of motion of a photon or subatomic particle as the result of a collision or interaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Refer to Johnson's four-path scattering model [13], the EM coupling interactions between the targets and the sea surface are computed in an iterative way.
ts] are the scattering fields from target to rough surface and from rough surface to target, respectively.
The hybrid method can solve the 3-D composite scattering problem with less computer memory.
There are two iterative processes in computing the composite scattering problem.
As increasing number of people are using ash scattering services together with Online Memorials and networking sites, blogs and Facebook, as ways of showing love and respect for the deceased.
In particular, it appears that a series of publications (2) tend to systematically dissociate the origins of dependent scattering from multiple scattering phenomena even in white paint films.
Keeping the above commentary in mind, the first objective of this study is to clarify the relationship between these two scattering regimes and to show that the process of dependent scattering of light in white paint films containing TiO2 pigments is only one particular manifestation of the multiple scattering phenomena described within the Foldy-Lax formalism.
An additional difficulty frequently encountered in the literature resides in the characterization of the dependent light scattering transition as a threshold type process in terms of the PVC.
One of the first experimental studies showing evidence of the dependent scattering of light phenomena in white paint films was published by Tinsley et al.
The scattering model of a 3-D object above a 2-D random dielectric rough surface is approached in this section.
Figures 1 and 2 show the "four-path" scattering model [5, 6].
The scattering of the composite model is solved in an iterative process.