scatological


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scatological

[skatəloj′ik]
pertaining to scatology.

scatological

adjective Referring to scatology, see there.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We re-encounter his masks and skulls in the work of Marlene Dumas and the Chapman Brothers, his scatological streak in Chris Ofili's Painting with Shit on It (1993) and his social criticism in Jeremy Deller's procession banners.
Then, it's only a matter of matching the DNA of a sidewalk pile to registration records to identify the scatological miscreant and let the fines hit the fan.
Then, it would be a matter of matching the DNA of a sidewalk pile to registration records to identify the scatological miscreant and let the frees hit the fan.
This is the more troubling because with the exception of appendices of two trial texts, quotes from the sources throughout the book are given only in English, so the unwilling reader must trust Garza's translations of a highly idiosyncratic sexual and scatological language.
This film, created by Penn Jillette (of Penn & Teller fame) and Paul Provenza, enlists the talents of more than 100 comedians to tell this highly scatological joke - and to explain why comedians love it so.
The following five chapters treat themes such as children, sacred and profane love, fame and public relations, licentious allusions, scatological double entendres, and the carnival themes such as the world upside down, before concluding with the representation of death, dying, and the Last Judgment in emblems.
Bruce trains her sights on soft-on-crime judges and jurors, obscene and scatological performance artists, foul-mouthed rappers, America-hating academics, and proponents of sex education.
He argues that Paradise Lost engages with religious satire and polemic; that this engagement reveals the poem's, and the poet's, anti-formalism (that is, the rejection of the orthodox Church of Stuart England); and that the manner of Paradise Lost thus admits of interplay between a diversity of literary modes, embracing the classical, the low, and even the scatological.
About one-quarter of the respondents use keyword searches of mail messages and/or computer files, primarily looking for explicit sexual or scatological phrases or language.
One result of the ethnographic perspective is that an entire chapter, intended to examine what Brown calls "the self-affirming voice and the narrative voice," is actually devoted to poems and song lyrics that represent "boast and toast traditions" derived from the "often scatological rhymes" once used by young men (quite exclusively) for their own peer group amusement.
The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, you might remember, canceled the comic strip last July after editors took offense to a mildly scatological punch line.
Currently the poetry slam, an event where drunken audiences hoot down sensitive poems about dying grandmothers or inevitable divorces and bestow twenty-dollar prizes on scatological doggerel, is sweeping the nation.