scapha


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scapha

 [ska´fah] (L.)
the curved depression separating the helix and antihelix of the ear.

sca·pha

(ska'fă, skā'fă),
1. The longitudinal furrow between the helix and the antihelix of the auricle. Synonym(s): fossa of helix
2. Obsolete term for scaphoid fossa.
[L. fr. G. skaphē, skiff]

scapha

/sca·pha/ (ska´fah) [L.] the curved depression separating the helix and anthelix.

sca·pha

(skā'fă)
The longitudinal furrow between the helix and the antihelix of the auricle.
[L. fr. G. skaphē, skiff]

scapha

pl. scaphae [L.] the hollow inside the peripheral part of the ear flap that leads into the tubular concha.
References in periodicals archive ?
Slightly trimming the scapha cartilage by partial abrasion can prevent sharp antihelical folding; however, combining this technique with suturing techniques can achieve better results.
We prefer to obtain the graft from the scapha which is thinner and has a more adequate shape and curvature than concha graft.
In conclusion, leprosy patients with paralytic lagophthalmos refractory to conventional repair can be treated using an auricular graft from the scapha with good aesthetic and functional results.
Eyelid reconstruction using cartilage grafts from auricular scapha.
This is especially true of Scene 3, which has an extended conversation between his mistress Philematium and her maid Scapha as the former completes her toilette.
25) Though Philematium is, by theatrical necessity, already clothed when she emerges from the house, her conversation with Scapha replicates the process through which a woman of fashion in antiquity would go to prepare herself for going out: from dress to hair to jewels to cosmetics to perfume.
She too loves him, so much so that she tells the maid Scapha during the course of the dressing scene that she intends to devote herself only to him, abandoning all of the other men who desire her services--an idea that Scapha, older and wiser, thinks foolhardy.
In the same vein, when Scapha asks what her mi stress imagines will happen to all of the other men who desire her services, Philematium answers: magis amabunt, / quom me videbunt gratiam referre bene merenti ("They'll love me even more when they see that I give back gratitude to one who has treated me well," 231-32).
Thus, when Scapha urges her mistress not to wear too much purple in her clothing or too much makeup on her face, she echoes the Roman mor alists who deplored fashionable women's propensity to extravagant adornment.
This is not to argue that Scapha and Philematium are cognizant of, and playing to, Philolaches' unseen presence; rather, we should see him in a metatheatrical sense, as an on-stage audience for their conversation, an audience who mirrors and reflects back on the response of the larger audience sitting in the stalls of the theater.
Philolaches' song and the succeeding scene between Philematium and Scapha offer two different models of how the idea and reality of the home may be deconstructed, as the hero's description of a house with walls destroyed gives way to scenes that treat the wall as if it did not exist.