scapegoating


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scapegoating

 [skāp´gōt-ing]
a process by which an individual or group is identified as being different from others and becomes the focus of the group's fears, anger, or aggression.

scapegoating

[skāp′gōting]
Etymology: ME, escapen, to escape, goot
the projection of blame, hostility, or suspicion onto one member of a group by other members to avoid self-confrontation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The novel's participation in the destruction of differences prepares readers for a story of scapegoating, as differences must be re-established through the persecution of a perceived outsider.
Ciuba argues that Percy's text, a mystery thriller wherein the hero Tom More must expose this syndrome, perfectly illustrates that such a culture is headed for an enormous scapegoating.
But, as any student of scapegoating knows, certain exclusions are inevitable.
This amounts to a near-admission that, atavistic though it may be, scapegoating is yet a necessary process in modernity, though its objects are plural and impermanent.
Scapegoating can have a profound effect on the intrapsychic functioning of the target member, but the phenomenon also affects subgroups and the group as a whole.
Thus, among cases in which scapegoating involves the ascription of moral blame, there can be great differences in the nature or seriousness of the situation in question.
But on the other hand, they rely on scapegoating, degradation ceremonies and total banishment of the scapegoat from the professional community.
This identification also contextualizes the reading of scapegoating as ritual purification, with Woodbridge moving away from the Christian archetype of the scapegoat-as-innocent to find Shakespeare's tragedies demonstrating that the sacrifice of the guilty party ("killing the king") is the more natural and redemptive practice.
While his initial focus on the scapegoating function surrounding and directed toward the women of Dickens's novels allows for some interesting and productive analysis, Heyns then meanders around practically the entire Dickens canon in a fashion that exasperated me.
Our] God submits to scapegoating rather than engaging in it.
Rather than pushing the pendulum of public policy between scapegoating the substance and scapegoating the individual, we should seek a middle ground.