scapegoating


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scapegoating

 [skāp´gōt-ing]
a process by which an individual or group is identified as being different from others and becomes the focus of the group's fears, anger, or aggression.

scapegoating

[skāp′gōting]
Etymology: ME, escapen, to escape, goot
the projection of blame, hostility, or suspicion onto one member of a group by other members to avoid self-confrontation.
References in periodicals archive ?
phenomenon of scapegoating in human societies to the criticism and
to recognize and name scapegoating for what it is, in order that it
phenomenon of scapegoating violence in all its guises.
Finally, the strongest reason to admire Ciuba's well crafted text is his argument for the power of Southern literature to expose the role of mimetic desire and his hope that this exposure might lead to a truly new South devoid of the need for scapegoating.
But from this it does not follow that the person has been made a scapegoat for the murder of Jones (as opposed to a different state of affairs), for scapegoating takes place only when some blame could be directed at others.
We shall therefore insist, not that moral blame can rightly be ascribed to the parties involved for scapegoating to take place, but only that it can reasonably be ascribed.
If all of this is true, our initial supposition, that scapegoating takes place only if the state of affairs for which blame is ascribed actually occurs, needs to be revised.
Unless society adapts to address these legitimate grievances, the scapegoating will spread, and rightwing populism can turn to violent authoritarian revolt or move towards fascism.
But we need to change the tone and content of that speech, which is filled with shrill invective, undocumented assertions, and scapegoating.
The way to disarm the militia movement is to address its real economic grievances, rationally refute its scapegoating, and expose the lies and prejudices that its most fanatical members spew.
The second discovery, made in the context of cultural anthropology and presented in Violence and the Sacred (1972), is of the way mimetic rivalry can lead to scapegoating and how such sacrifice of innocents provides the foundation for myths, rituals, and other elements of human civilization.
These chapters intermingle Girard's insights into the Bible's revelation of scapegoating with his analysis of ancient myths, romantic novels, and modern philosophy, as well as his criticism of romanticism, rationalism, relativism, and secularism.