scapegoating

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scapegoating

 [skāp´gōt-ing]
a process by which an individual or group is identified as being different from others and becomes the focus of the group's fears, anger, or aggression.

scapegoating

[skāp′gōting]
Etymology: ME, escapen, to escape, goot
the projection of blame, hostility, or suspicion onto one member of a group by other members to avoid self-confrontation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incest is a common scapegoat story feature, ranking alongside "rape" and "bestiality" as a sexual crime that "transgress[es] the taboos that are considered the strictest" (Scapegoat 15).
The critical international and national media were made the scapegoats for the negative press coverage when in fact it was Erdoy-an who made a series of public blunders, such as stating his wish to copy the Nazi-era Hitler regime as part of his wish to become an executive president.
For Girard, the passion and other biblical narratives are not sacrificial because, unlike other foundational myths, the Bible does not turn innocent victims into scapegoats or normal human victims into divine objects of worship.
Filming on The Scapegoat began in London this week and it seems Matthew, 36, is still hot property.
King apparently decided that Islam is to be the scapegoat for America's ills; and he is now on a witch-hunt for Muslims to burn.
The bottom line is that managers and employees risk harming the entire organization when they scapegoat others, he said, adding that it's "not the best way to protect your ego," Harvey says.
From Fred Merkle of the 1908 Giants, marked forever by his failure to tag second base on a winning hit, to Mitch Williams of the Phillies, whose home run toss to Toronto's Joe Carter ended the 1993 World Series, the author explores how nine selected players became marked for life as baseball's scapegoats by the media and fans.
The 25-year-old, who was punished by the Premier League for an illegal meeting with Chelsea, claims the Gunners used him as a scapegoat over the "tapping up" affair with the Premiership champions.
Relying on Girard's distinction between a scapegoat in the text and a scapegoat of the text, Cousineau shows how, while these narrators tend to shift who we see as a scapegoat in the text, the texts overall avoid making scapegoats, but only if we read these books with great care, focusing on "the objective pattern of events of the novel, as distinct from the narrator's perspective on them" (29).
But last night, her husband Andrew spoke out for the first time to say she had been made a scapegoat during a "year of hell", and was taking the PCT to a tribunal claiming unfair dismissal.
They were due to hold an emergency meeting today but Mr Singh, 40, said he has been made a scapegoat.