scapegoating

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scapegoating

 [skāp´gōt-ing]
a process by which an individual or group is identified as being different from others and becomes the focus of the group's fears, anger, or aggression.

scapegoating

[skāp′gōting]
Etymology: ME, escapen, to escape, goot
the projection of blame, hostility, or suspicion onto one member of a group by other members to avoid self-confrontation.
References in periodicals archive ?
For Girard, the passion and other biblical narratives are not sacrificial because, unlike other foundational myths, the Bible does not turn innocent victims into scapegoats or normal human victims into divine objects of worship.
King apparently decided that Islam is to be the scapegoat for America's ills; and he is now on a witch-hunt for Muslims to burn.
Scapegoat addresses the savvy male consumer who values a seamless combination of purposeful function with classic form.
The council is looking for a scapegoat but it's not going to be me.
The scapegoat can really have little complaint at this point; it should recognise that this was bound to happen.
I firmly believe black players who were no doubt upset by what went on in Madrid were looking for a scapegoat, and David Sullivan was wrongly made that scapegoat.
Frame specialist Roy Irlam has made a replica surround for Holman Holt's painting The Scapegoat because the original is too fragile.
But Troy Ellerman, a lawyer representing Balco boss Victor Conte, said: "To use Conte as a scapegoat to try to get out of a ban is inexcusable.
AXED Stranraer striker Ian Harty claimed last night he is being made a scapegoat.
Speaking earlier this year Mr Faber, 53, who worked as a social worker for 25 years said, ``I believe I have been made a scapegoat by the council.
Morrison skillfully and subtly inserts each of these peripheral histories into her novel through a particular metaphoric description: naming the prostitute Marie "Maginot Line," describing Maureen Peal's "long brown hair" as "braided into two lynch ropes," depicting Pecola as a scapegoat, and characterizing the public sphere as a hemmed garment.