scanty

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scanty

(skăn′tē) [ME. from O. Norse, skamt, short]
Not abundant; insufficient, as a secretion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous complaints were reported over several days about the scantiness of the rations and the fact that the tents that were provided were not keeping out the rain.
The scantiness of data on how private-run confessional school policies and practices respond to pluralism through inter-group learning in the history and religion curricula, indicate the need for systematic research on the effectiveness of these schools in preparing students for life in plural Lebanon.
17) This scenario could explain the abundance of eosinophilic mucin in one set of patients and scantiness of it in the other The likelihood of sampling is a legitimate thought; however, our study was a retrospective investigation and devoid of bias.
Dundee will also look to expose the same lack of character and scantiness of spirit which cost Barnes his job.
First, "owing to the scantiness of the evidence, any reconstruction of the sequence of events that made up the Assyrian conquest of Samaria is liable to involve uncertainties inviting debate" (p.
Although it didn't dawn on me at the time, I later realized that one of the benefits for me in Nat Turner's story was not an abundance of historical material but, if anything, a scantiness.
Considering the scantiness of the remains, Snyder is wise to refrain from broad generalizations.
The highly distinguished contributors do largely achieve this aim; and, if they fad, die fault lies less with them than with the scantiness of the available internal evidence for Roman-period Judaism (which we are so often forced to view through sceptical pagan eyes or through downright hostile Christian ones).
Owing to the scantiness of fieldwork the publication naturally enough could not achieve perfection, and certainly not the academic weight either.
The scantiness of Huntington's references to Palestine provides an oddity for an analysis that focuses on conflicts among civilizations.
All this, of course, denies scantiness of detail the ability to characterize a narrative in its own right; not all narratives must be filled out with detail and their own internal exegetical apparatus.