scalpel


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scalpel

 [skal´p'l]
a small surgical knife with a convex or concave sharp edge; there are now types consisting of a handle with a disposable blade.
Scalpel. From Dorland's, 2000.

scal·pel

(skal'pĕl),
A knife used in surgical dissection.
[L. scalpellum; dim. of scalprum, a knife]

scalpel

/scal·pel/ (skal´p'l) a small surgical knife usually having a convex edge.

scalpel

(skăl′pəl)
n.
A small straight knife with a thin sharp blade used in surgery and dissection.

scalpel

[skal′pəl]
Etymology: L, scalprum, knife
a small pointed knife with a convex edge. Some scalpels use interchangeable blades for specific surgical procedures, such as operating and amputating. Multiple kinds of scalpels are used; they are identified by number. Number 10 is the most common.

scalpel

Surgery A surgical cutting knife, usually understood to have a curved and disposible blade. See Rotary gamma scalpel.

scal·pel

(skalp'ĕl)
A knife used in surgical dissection.
[L. scalpellum; dim. of scalprum, a knife]

scalpel

(skal'pel) [L. scalpellum, small surgical knife]
Enlarge picture
SCALPELS: A. Disposable B. Handles
Enlarge picture
SCALPELS: A. Disposable B. Handles
A straight or angle-tipped handle for holding a surgical blade. See: illustration

harmonic scalpel

Abbreviation: HS
An ultrasonic dissecting device used in surgery to disrupt, disintegrate, or coagulate tissues, especially those with a high water or fat content. The device works by cavitating the tissues it contacts. When used laparoscopically, tissues destroyed by the scalpel are removed from the body by aspiration. Synonym: ultrasonic dissector

hemostatic scalpel

A scalpel that cuts and cauterizes tissue at the same time.

plasma scalpel

A scalpel that uses argon gas heated to an ionized plasma to divide tissues and cauterize bleeding blood vessels, e.g., during surgery or after trauma.
Synonym: plasma knife

scalpel

A surgical knife. Most scalpels consist of handles of various size that can be fitted with disposable steel blades. For delicate purposes, such as ophthalmic surgery, scalpels are made very small and fine and the cutting edge may be made of ruby or diamond.

scalpel

fine, sharp knife; used for surgical division of soft tissues

scal·pel

(skalp'ĕl)
A knife used in surgical dissection.
[L. scalpellum; dim. of scalprum, a knife]

scalpel (skal´pəl),

n a delicate, razor-sharp, pointed knife, usually with a convex edge.
scalpel, electrosurgical,
n a scalpel that severs tissue by means of an electrically heated wire.

scalpel

small surgical knife. The traditional fixed blade model usually has a convex edge. Modern instruments have detachable blades in a great variety of shapes. There are other more sophisticated cutting instruments such as the argon plasma scalpel, the carbon dioxide laser scalpel, the electrosurgical scalpel and the high-energy scalpel.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, why didn't the probe officer AGL Kaul ask Talwars for producing surgical scalpel.
The scalpel is so precise that it can cut a window in an eggshell while leaving intact the thin membrane that surrounds the egg white.
Endothelium histological integrity after skeletonized dissection of the left internal mammary artery with ultrasonic scalpel.
The Ligasure operation took significantly less time to perform than did the procedure using the Harmonic Scalpel (11 min.
Deputy District Judge John Charles told him, 'There is no reason you should have a scalpel in a public place, let alone brandish it.
The pounds 30,000 harmonic scalpel has been introduced at University Hospital Aintree, Fazakerley.
The pounds 30,000 harmonic scalpel allows surgeons at University Hospital Aintree, Fazakerley, to halve operation and waiting times for liver cancer patients.
Mr Matthews said: "Unlike the time-honoured surgical scalpel, which depends on the force of the blade to cut tissues, leading both to trauma to the tissues and bleeding which has to be stopped, the harmonic scalpel depends on very high frequency vibration of its blade to part tissues.
A key-hole procedure was used, which involved inflating the abdomen with gas, cutting a small hole with a scalpel and then inserting viewing tubes.
When a colleague who had received a scalpel cut died of infection, Semmelweis concluded that puerperal fever was septic and contagious.
Step 2 - Use the scalpel to carefully score through the polycarbonate to cut out your desired shape.
Not some powerfully built player with bat or executive with pen, but this gentle North Carolina native with the deft scalpel.