saw

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saw

(saw),
A metal operating instrument having an edge of sharp, toothlike projections, for dividing bone, cartilage, or plaster; edges may be attached to a rigid band, a flexible wire or chain, or a motorized oscillator.
[A.S. saga]

saw

(saw) a cutting instrument with a serrated edge.
Gigli's wire saw  a flexible wire with saw teeth.
Enlarge picture
Gigli's wire saw as used in removing segment of the skull.

saw

Orthopedics Any of a number of manual or electric devices with a serrated cutting edge, used to cut bone and/or hard tissue. See Stryker saw.

saw

(saw)
A metal operating instrument having an edge of sharp, toothlike projections, for dividing bone, cartilage, or plaster; edges may be attached to a rigid band, a flexible wire or chain, or a motorized oscillator.
[A.S. saga]

saw

(saw)
A metal operating instrument having an edge of sharp, toothlike projections, for dividing bone, cartilage, or plaster; edges may be attached to a rigid band, a flexible wire or chain, or a motorized oscillator.
[A.S. saga]

saw,

n a cutting blade with a toothed edge used to cut material too hard to slice with a knife.
saw, Gigli's wire,
n.pr a flexible wire with teeth used for osteotomy procedures; often used in blind operations.
saw, gold,
n an instrument with a thin sawlike blade used for removing surplus metal from the contact area of gold-foil restorations.
saw, Joseph,
n.pr a nasal saw often used in ramusotomy of the mandible.
saw, Koeber's,
n.pr a saw consisting of a thin, replaceable blade held in a frame; used to trim gross excess from the proximal portion of a Class II foil restoration in the preliminary stages of finishing and contouring.
saw, oscillating,
n an oscillating blade in an electrical or compressed gas-driven unit; used to cut bone.
saw, rotary,
n a rotary blade on a shaft in an electrical or compressed gas-driven unit; used to cut bone.

saw

multi-toothed cutting instrument.

chain saw
Stryker saw
surgical saw
modeled on carpentry tools but made of sterilizable materials; used for cutting cartilage and bone.
wire saw
References in periodicals archive ?
SPYMASTERS Andrew Parker, SirJohn Sawers and Sir Iain Lobban
The court heard Mr Bruder believed that there had been a deliberate attempt by Mr Sawers to make him change his statement.
I would like to pay tribute to John Sawers for his lifetime's dedication to the country and particularly to his time as C.
One suspects Al-Qaeda is actually lapping up how Sawers and his colleagues allowed a terror suspect under 24-hour surveillance evade his minders last week by slipping into a burka and wandering off in broad daylight through the streets of central London.
From left) The Director-General of security service MI5, Andrew Parker, the Chief of the Secret Intelligence Service, Sir John Sawers and Director of GCHQ Sir Iain Lobban at the Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC)
Sir Sawers called on the Emir on the occasion of his current visit to Qatar.
According to The Telegraph, Sawers said that existing officers are also increasingly less willing to 'go that extra mile' because they are not sufficiently rewarded for their performance.
According to the Telegraph, Sawers said Iran was now "two years away" from becoming a "nuclear weapons state.
Fellow GB canoeist Louisa Sawers said: "You will always find Rachel in a corner knitting away, so we call her an old biddy.
Brabants, Edward McKeever, Liam Heath, Jonathan Schofield, Jessica Walker, Rachel Cawthorn, Angela Hannah and Louisa Sawers will compete in the kayak across six events, with Richard Jefferies racing in the canoe in two events.
DOORS OF PERCEPTION The head of Britain's secret intelligence service, John Sawers, picked Jim Lambie's surreal sculpture of a folded peach door stuck to a wall sideways.
The head of Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, John Sawers, said in a speech last week that "intelligence-led operations" were needed to prevent Iran getting a nuclear bomb, a comment interpreted in Tehran as proof that Britain was using subterfuge against the government.