saturnine


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saturnine

 [sat´ur-nīn]
pertaining to lead.

sat·ur·nine

(sat'ŭr-nīn),
1. Relating to lead.
2. Due to or symptomatic of lead poisoning.
[Mediev. L. saturninus, fr. saturnus, lead, fr. L. saturnus, the god and planet Saturn]

saturnine

(săt′ər-nīn′)
adj.
1. Having the temperament of one born under the supposed astrological influence of Saturn.
2.
a. Melancholy or sullen.
b. Having or marked by a tendency to be bitter or sardonic: a saturnine expression on his face.
3. Produced by absorption of lead.

sat′ur·nine′ly adv.

saturnine

[sat′ərnīn]
pertaining to lead or lead poisoning.

sat·ur·nine

(sat'ŭr-nīn)
1. Relating to lead.
2. Due to or symptomatic of lead poisoning.
3. Denotes a surly facial expression.
[Mediev. L. saturninus, fr. saturnus, lead, fr. L. Saturnus, the god and planet Saturn]

saturnine

pertaining to lead, the poisonous metal.
References in classic literature ?
Trumbull was to have the gold-headed cane and fifty pounds; the other second cousins and the cousins present were each to have the like handsome sum, which, as the saturnine cousin observed, was a sort of legacy that left a man nowhere; and there was much more of such offensive dribbling in favor of persons not present-- problematical, and, it was to be feared, low connections.
He, who had been so merry-hearted, even merrier-hearted than his brother Jerry, began to grow saturnine, and peevish, and ill-tempered.
Harkey, a long, lank Texan, was unusually friendly for one with a saturnine disposition, and, as long as his theory that gold grew was not challenged, was quite companionable.
It occurred a thousand miles to the westward of Manatomana, on the island of Tagalag," he continued abruptly, with an air of saturnine disappointment in that there had been no discussion.
Butler, a reserved and saturnine man, spent much of his uneventful life in the employ
He viewed the apoplectic, goggle-eyed mate and the saturnine, heavy-eyed steward as the victims of a peculiar and secret form of lunacy which poisoned their lives.
Father Brown seemed rather to like the saturnine candour of the soldier.
Our readers will probably be divided in their opinions concerning this action; some may applaud it perhaps as an act of extraordinary humanity, while those of a more saturnine temper will consider it as a want of regard to that justice which every man owes his country.
Somebody strike a light, my thumb's out of joint," said one of the men, Parsons, a swarthy, saturnine man, boat-steerer in Standish's boat, in which Harrison was puller.
Grave in exterior, saturnine by temperament, formidable by his physical means, and dangerous from his lawless obstinacy, his self-constituted tribunal excited a degree of awe, to which even the intelligent Middleton could not bring himself to be entirely insensible.
The Artful, meantime, who was of a rather saturnine disposition, and seldom gave way to merriment when it interfered with business, rifled Oliver's pockets with steady assiduity.
Having made up his mind on that point, he strode along without swerving, contracting some rather saturnine sternness, as a young man is likely to do who has a premature call upon him for self-reliance.