satellite cells


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Related to satellite cells: Glial cells, Ependymal cells

sat·el·lite cells

neuroglial cells surrounding the cell body of a neuron in the spinal, cranial, and autonomic ganglia.

satellite cells

[sat′əlīt]
Etymology: L, satelles, attendant, cella, storeroom
glial cells (astrocytes) that form around damaged nerve cells and lie close to neuron bodies in the central nervous system.
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Satellite cells
References in periodicals archive ?
To our knowledge, this study first demonstrated the interference of LXR[alpha] on bovine muscle satellite cells in vitro to investigate LXR[alpha] gene's function and its target genes.
Many growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor 1, hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factors, and platelet-derived growth factors, as well as cytokines, have been identified as causing proliferation of satellite cells, with subsequent transformation into myotubes and muscle fibers, to regulate myoblast proliferation and differentiation, and to muscle regeneration or repair [9].
Undernutrition impairs the proliferation of satellite cells resulting in muscle atrophy and myonuclei decrease (Carlson and Faulkner, 1988; Dedkov et al.
Kadi F, Thornell LE, 2000, Concomitant increases in myonuclear and satellite cell content in female trapezius muscle following strength training.
Muscle satellite cells and endothelial cells: close neighbors and privileged partners," Molecular Biology of the Cell, vol.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of MENS on the regeneration process of injured skeletal muscle and to investigate whether satellite cells in injured skeletal muscle are activated by MENS.
However, when they surgically conjoined old and young mice so that they shared blood, the satellite cells in the old mice exhibited "restored genomic integrity.
We identified satellite cells in muscle specimens by labeling Pax7 (1:50, Developmental Studies), a transcription factor specific for quiescent, activated, and proliferating satellite cells.
In tests, the labA[degrees]grown muscle was found to be strong and good at contracting and was able to repair itself using the satellite cells when the researchers damaged it with a toxin.
Every muscle has satellite cells on reserve, ready to activate upon injury and begin the regeneration process.
Through years of perfecting their techniques, a team led by Bursac and graduate student Mark Juhas discovered that preparing better muscle requires two things: well-developed contractile muscle fibers and a pool of muscle stem cells, known as satellite cells.