sarcopenic obesity

sarcopenic obesity

A form of obesity which is operationally defined as excess weight and reduced muscle mass and/or strength, a combination that occurs in 4 to 9% of obese patients. Formal confirmation that a person has sarcopenic obesity requires higher-tech tools—e.g., CT, dual X-ray absorptiometry, anthropometrics and bioelectrical impedance—which should be reserved for thorough clinical examination and for assessing the effectiveness of interventions.

Aetiology
Age-related changes in body composition, physical inactivity, inflammation, insulin resistance, reduced growth hormone and testosterone, malnutrition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biophytis' first project, SARCOB, targets the treatment of sarcopenic obesity, in partnership with the Myology Institute and Institute of Cardio-metabolism and Nutrition, both at the University of Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC), and France's national agricultural research institute, INRA.
Obesity and muscle atrophy coexist in a condition known as sarcopenic obesity, which predicts mortality and often responds to treatment.
The cause for sarcopenic obesity could be genetic or epigenetic, but there could be a host of modifying factors in late life like physical activity, endocrine changes, infections, drugs, stress and habituations (64-67).
Sarcopenic obesity predicts instrumental activities of daily living disability in the elderly.
While analysing the computed tomography scans of 250 obese cancer patients, the researchers found that that people with a condition called sarcopenic obesity, a depletion of lean muscle mass, survived months less than their obese counterparts who had more muscle mass.
In many cases, people with sarcopenic obesity have as little or sometimes less muscle mass than thin people who look as of they were made of skin and bones," The Lancet quoted Vickie Baracos, a professor of oncology and adjunct professor of human nutrition at the University of Alberta, and lead author on the study as saying.
Sarcopenic obesity, a condition that causes the loss of muscle mass and increasing body fat, has recently been found to be highly associated with female sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to research by Doctor Jon Giles of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, US.
Obesity and muscle atrophy can coexist in a condition known as sarcopenic obesity, which suggests obesity more advanced than indicated by body mass index (BMI) alone.
Clinical detection of sarcopenic obesity by bioelectrical impedance analysis.
In addition to thinning hair and brittle nails, they may have muscle atrophy, even in the midst of obesity--a condition known as sarcopenic obesity.