sarcopenic obesity

sarcopenic obesity

A form of obesity which is operationally defined as excess weight and reduced muscle mass and/or strength, a combination that occurs in 4 to 9% of obese patients. Formal confirmation that a person has sarcopenic obesity requires higher-tech tools—e.g., CT, dual X-ray absorptiometry, anthropometrics and bioelectrical impedance—which should be reserved for thorough clinical examination and for assessing the effectiveness of interventions.

Aetiology
Age-related changes in body composition, physical inactivity, inflammation, insulin resistance, reduced growth hormone and testosterone, malnutrition.
References in periodicals archive ?
This state is called sarcopenic obesity, and thus the relationship between reductions of muscle mass is often independent of body mass.
Therefore, one can have a high BMI with weak muscle strength due to sarcopenic obesity.
2013) showed that physical activity was inversely associated with sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in the elderly Korean population.
Though we were unable to define sarcopenic obesity in this sample, this body composition phenotype may be common in osteoarthritic patients, which may be due to low physical activity levels [27].
The implications of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity on cardiometabolic disease.
The association between the ratio of visceral fat to thigh muscle area and metabolic syndrome: the Korean Sarcopenic Obesity Study (KSOS).
Biophytis' first project, SARCOB, targets the treatment of sarcopenic obesity, in partnership with the Myology Institute and Institute of Cardio-metabolism and Nutrition, both at the University of Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC), and France's national agricultural research institute, INRA.
Obesity and muscle atrophy coexist in a condition known as sarcopenic obesity, which predicts mortality and often responds to treatment.
If you have sarcopenic obesity, you need to both do weightlifting or other resistance exercise to build muscle while also losing excess fat by eating a healthy diet with adequate protein to maintain your muscle and control your appetite.
The cause for sarcopenic obesity could be genetic or epigenetic, but there could be a host of modifying factors in late life like physical activity, endocrine changes, infections, drugs, stress and habituations (64-67).
2] or between 25 and 30 were more likely than controls to have sarcopenic obesity (defined as too little muscle and too much fat).