saprophyte


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saprophyte

 [sap´ro-fīt]
any organism, such as a bacterium or protozoon, living upon dead or decaying organic matter. For fungi, the preferred term is saprobe. adj., adj saprophyt´ic.

sap·ro·phyte

(sap'rō-fīt),
An organism that grows on dead organic matter, plant or animal. See: saprobe.
Synonym(s): necroparasite
[sapro- + G. phyton, plant]

saprophyte

/sap·ro·phyte/ (sap´ro-fīt) any organism living upon dead or decaying organic matter. For fungi, the preferred term is saprobe. saprophyt´ic

saprophyte

(săp′rə-fīt′)
n.
An organism, especially a fungus or bacterium, that derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter. Also called saprobe.

sap′ro·phyt′ic (-fĭt′ĭk) adj.
sap′ro·phyt′i·cal·ly adv.

saprophyte

[sap′rəfīt]
Etymology: Gk, sapros, rotten, phyton, plant
an organism that lives on dead organic matter. saprophytic, adj.

sap·robe

(sap'rōb)
An organism that lives on dead organic material. usage note This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]

saprophyte

An organism that lives on and derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter.

saprophyte

or

saprotroph

any plant or microorganism that obtains its nutrition from dead or decaying organic materials in the form of organic substances in solution. Such organisms are of great importance in breaking down dead organic material. see NITROGEN CYCLE.

sap·robe

(sap'rōb)
An organism that lives on dead organic material. usage note This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]

saprophyte,

n an organism that lives on dead organic matter.

saprophyte

any organism, such as a bacterium, capable of living in inanimate media.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microbacterium spp are generally believed to be normal saprophytes of the external auditory canal, although one study showed that they were present in 9.
Chromobacterium violaceum is an aerobic, gram-negative bacillus usually found as a saprophyte in soil and water in tropical and subtropical regions (1).
Although mainly a saprophyte that lives in the plant-soil environment, L.
We suggest that all 4 bacteria were present in the termites' body as saprophytes as previously observed (Chouvenc et al.
They are saprophytes (organisms which live on decaying matter) that are usually innocuous, but become pathogenic when the host becomes abnormally susceptible to infection.
tuberregium sclerotia could thrive well in sawdust because they are wood decaying saprophytes which can digest extra cellular lignocelluloses and hemicelluloses deriving nutrients from them [9, 20].
Most fungal invaders of the orbit are opportunistic saprophytes.
On the other hand, the saprophytes who have returned after the war's conclusions have done so to feed on the corpse of their country, which constitutes a different kind of betrayal to the narrator.
Actually, that activity is carried out by a class of fungi called saprophytes, which are likely to be active anywhere there are accumulations of such residues on or under the soil surface.
It has been claimed that biochar can influence microbial activity by providing a favourable microhabitat (pore space), due to its weak alkalinity and by being a substrate unfavourable for saprophytes (Saito and Marumoto 2002).
The use of total coliform and fecal coliform bacteria did not make the contribution of storm water apparent because some coliform organisms are saprophytes and can bloom in higher water temperatures without being linked to a pollution source (Greenberg, Clesceri, & Eaton, 1992).
Environmental mycobacteria also referred to as atypical mycobacteria or non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are common saprophytes in all natural ecosystems, such as water, soil, food and dust (1-3).