sanitize

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sanitize

 [san´ĭ-tīz]
to clean and sterilize.

sanitize

(săn′ĭ-tīz′)
tr.v. sani·tized, sani·tizing, sani·tizes
To make sanitary, as by cleaning or disinfecting.

san′i·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.

sanitize

[san′itīz]
Etymology: L, sanitas, health
to take action needed to clean the environment or a part of it, removing or reducing pathogenic microorganisms and their habitats.
A euphemism for ex post facto alteration of a patient’s hospital or medical records by rewriting and reformatting, in particular those related to peer review

sanitize

Forensic medicine A euphemism for falsification by rewriting and reformatting various hospital records, in particular those related to peer review. See Malpractice.

sanitize

to clean and sterilize.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hand sanitizers are more popular among consumers because of the increase in awareness about the threat of diseases worldwide.
Many nonprofit organizations are distributing sanitizers, face masks and spray bottles.
To ascertain the frequency and usage of hand sanitizers amongst consumers, and the circumstances in which they are used 2.
They were then treated with electrolyzed oxidizing water (EO), quaternary ammonium, an acidic compound and hypochlorite sanitizers.
In an incident, a nurse from Pennsylvania placed responsibility on hand sanitizers for her failed test, according to the Wall Street Journal.
Traditional sanitizers used by restaurants contain chemicals found in bleach, which can corrode dishware, damage the environment, and irritate or bum the skin.
Alcohol-based hand sanitizers have been documented to cause a variety of skin maladies, most notably hand dermatitis.
While the Worcester Regional Transit Authority does not offer such sanitizers to passengers, it makes them available to drivers, said John F.
12), flu fears (and student supply lists) helped propel sales of hand sanitizer and hand soaps in that retail sector.
A 2005 study by the Children's Hospital in Boston compared illness rates across a study group of 292 families--half of them got hand sanitizers while the other half were given literature advising them of the benefits of frequent hand washing.
A word of caution to parents, grandparents, and others with youngsters in their lives: Hand sanitizers may contain more than 60 percent alcohol--and it only takes a small amount of these products to poison small children.
I have been hearing about children getting alcohol poisoning from hand sanitizers.