sandwich generation


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sandwich generation

members of the middle generation who are trying to raise children and help aging parents at the same time.
A popular term referring to the generation of people who provide care for both their parents and their children, so called as they are 'sandwiched' between the two

sand·wich gen·er·a·tion

(sand'wich jen'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
A term used to describe a generation of people who care for their aging parents or other relatives while supporting their own children: essentially "in the middle;" hence, the term sandwich.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wales' two commissioners at both ends of the age spectrum today raise the alarm about the effect on this sandwich generation of caring for the young and old.
An online search for information on the sandwich generation produced nearly 500,000 hits.
The term sandwich generation has been used to describe families who are concurrently caring for both children and parents (Hansen, 1997).
Our products offer peace of mind for those of us in the sandwich generation as we struggle to care for our parents as well as our own families.
McFedries carefully provides citations to the first appearance of terms such as "supercentenarian," "grand boomer," "grey nomad," "elder orphan," "club sandwich generation," and "geezer glut" (McFedries & Logophilia Limited, n.
Raphael (1993) "The woman in the middle: the sandwich generation revised".
In the sandwich generation between dependent children and increasingly elderly parents, more of us Americans are finding our flaunted independence curtailed, sometimes suddenly, by the needs of those around us.
When I first began to consider the featured theme of this issue, Law and the Sandwich Generation, I assumed it would be easy to put together our regular five articles on ways the law has an impact on the lives of the Sandwich Generation.
The current generation of parents in the 35- to 50-year range typically are referred to as "the sandwich generation," with dependents at both ends of the age spectrum.
Given the economic pressures facing families today, it's troubling that detailed conversations are not happening, especially among those in the sandwich generation who may be grappling with competing financial priorities ranging from planning for their own retirement and paying for a child's college education to dealing with eldercare, estate planning and retirement challenges with their parents," said Kathleen A.
In 2005, the sandwich generation was largely made up of Baby Boomers.