sanatorium

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sanatorium

 [san″ah-to´re-um]
an institution for treatment of sick persons, especially a private hospital for convalescents or patients who are not extremely ill; often applied to an institution for the treatment of tuberculosis.

san·a·to·ri·um

(san'ă-tō'rē-ŭm), In modern usage this word is virtually synonymous with sanitarium.
An institution for the treatment of chronic disorders and a place for recuperation under medical supervision. Compare: sanitarium.
[Mod. L. neuter of sanatorius, curative, fr. sano, to cure, heal]

sanatorium

/san·a·to·ri·um/ (san″ah-tor´e-um) an institution for treatment of sick persons, especially a private hospital for convalescents or patients with chronic diseases or mental disorders.

sanatorium

(săn′ə-tôr′ē-əm)
n. pl. sana·toriums or sana·toria (-tôr′ē-ə)
1. An institution for the treatment of chronic diseases or for medically supervised recuperation.
2. A resort for improvement or maintenance of health, especially for convalescents. Also called sanitarium.

sanatorium

san·a·to·ri·um

(san'ă-tōr'ē-ŭm)
An institution for the treatment of chronic disorders and a place for recuperation under medical supervision.
[Mod. L. neuter of sanatorius, curative, fr. sano, to cure, heal]

san·a·to·ri·um

(san'ă-tōr'ē-ŭm)
Institution for treatment of chronic disorders and a place for recuperation under medical supervision.
[Mod. L. neuter of sanatorius, curative, fr. sano, to cure, heal]
References in periodicals archive ?
In a city of 9 sanatoria, which is far from the sea, are situated more than 30 hotels.
In 1996, Children's Health Care is a Legal Duty (CHILD) filed suit challenging the payments because federal law singled out only Christian Science sanatoria for the assistance.
Drawing on the largely unexplored manuscript collection of Flick himself, who, as an early proponent of the idea that consumption was contagious, helped organize the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, conducted an extensive private practice, established several sanatoria and founded a tuberculosis research institute, Bates is able to give a full account of the vagaries of the anti-tuberculosis movement in Pennsylvania from 1880 to the 1930s.