sample

(redirected from samples)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

sample

 
1. a representative part taken to typify the whole.
2. a subset of a population that is selected for inclusion in a research study.

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl),
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample

Etymology: L, exemplum
(in research) a group or part of the whole that can be used to demonstrate characteristics of the whole. Kinds of samples include cluster, convenience, random, and stratified.

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random (haphazard) or nonrandom, representative or nonrepresentative.
3. A piece or portion of a whole that will demonstrate the characteristics or qualities of that whole.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample

any portion of a whole, such as a small part of a population, collected for examination.

sampling 

The selection of a group of subjects from a population. This is usually done for the purpose of experimentation. The part of the population selected is called the sample: it is usually considered to be representative of a given population. A good sample must be random, i.e. every possible member of that population has an equal chance of being selected. Otherwise, it is said to be biased. Sampling can extend either across geographical areas (spatial sampling) or over a period of time (temporal sampling).

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. Specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. Selected subset of a population; may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample,

n a selected part of a population that is taken to be representative of the whole population.
sample, random,
n a sample drawn by chance; a sample drawn in such a way that every item in the population has an equal and independent chance of being included in the sample.
sample, stratified,
n a sample derived by dividing the population into a number of nonoverlapping classes or categories from which cases are selected at random, the number of cases selected from each category being proportional to the number therein.

sample

1. a specimen of fluid, blood or tissue collected for analysis on the assumption that it represents the composition of the whole.
2. for statistical purposes a small collection of individual units taken from the population which is under investigation on the assumption that they represent the characteristics of the entire population.

EPSEM sample
acronym for 'equal opportunity of selection method'.
grab sample
sample of greasy wool taken at random by a special machine from each bale on the sale floor. Buyers price the bale on the basis of the appearance of the grab sample and the objective measurements.
multi-stage random sample
with very large populations it may be desirable to arrange the data into groups on one criterion, e.g. address by area of postcode, and to select randomly from within this group, then select from within this sample to obtain randomly a representative number of specimens, such as dogs of each age group.
random sample
the selection from a population of the units which are to constitute the sample of that population is made in such a way that each unit of the population has an equal chance of being selected. Called also simple random sample.
simple random sample
see random sample (above).
stratified random sample
the data is arranged into subsets or strata based on the possession of certain characteristics which are common to the members of the subset. The selection of units to comprise the sample of the parent population is arranged so that the proportional representation of each subset in the final sample fits a prearranged schedule.
volunteer sample
sample donated by interested parties; a biased sample because it does not represent all sections of the population. Called also self-selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this study was to identify and describe SaV strains in environmental samples, namely, untreated wastewater, treated wastewater, a river, and seawater, in Japan.
There are several possible causes for the problems you have identified, and they deal with your sampling processes, the way you are performing the reduced pressure test (RPT) and variations in the samples themselves.
Modifications to this test allow samples to cool to a desired temperature in the compressed state before being removed from fixtures, and allowed to recover to their final thickness.
At Monsanto's request, residual samples from those originally tested by Swan et al.
Moreover, to associate qualitative data analyses with small samples is to ignore the growing body of literature in the area of text mining--the process of analyzing naturally occurring text in order to discover and capture semantic information (see for example, Del Rio, Kostoff, Garcia, Ramirez, & Humenik, 2002; Liddy, 2000; Powis & Cairns, 2003; Srinivasan, 2004).
The spatial and angular distributions of the neutrons incident on the samples in view of the possible slit interferences through the three serial slits in Fig.
The revenue procedure builds on the requirements outlined in the Large and Mid-Size Business Division's March 2002 IRS Field Directive on the Use of Probability Samples by Taxpayers (2002 Field Directive).
In most soil samples, mineral composition is the constituent material that relates directly to the ability to compare it by using a microscope.
The memorandum contains samples of the specific sampling plans and formulas that would be permissible to create a valid statistical sample.
There is a longstanding mythology in newsletter industry literature that samples don't work in subscriber acquisition, except--the conventional reasoning goes--when it's a title where the content is similar from issue to issue, e.
Race and other scientists outlined plans for gathering and retrieving Martian samples at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia in February and at a conference on astrobiology at George Washington University in Washington, D.
The RAMA instrument requires no sample weighing and no operator attention, so reproducible tests on up to 10 samples per hour can be achieved, versus up to a maximum of four samples per hour in conventional dynamic mechanical testing.