sample


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sample

 
1. a representative part taken to typify the whole.
2. a subset of a population that is selected for inclusion in a research study.

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl),
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample

Etymology: L, exemplum
(in research) a group or part of the whole that can be used to demonstrate characteristics of the whole. Kinds of samples include cluster, convenience, random, and stratified.

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random (haphazard) or nonrandom, representative or nonrepresentative.
3. A piece or portion of a whole that will demonstrate the characteristics or qualities of that whole.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample

any portion of a whole, such as a small part of a population, collected for examination.

sampling 

The selection of a group of subjects from a population. This is usually done for the purpose of experimentation. The part of the population selected is called the sample: it is usually considered to be representative of a given population. A good sample must be random, i.e. every possible member of that population has an equal chance of being selected. Otherwise, it is said to be biased. Sampling can extend either across geographical areas (spatial sampling) or over a period of time (temporal sampling).

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. Specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. Selected subset of a population; may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample,

n a selected part of a population that is taken to be representative of the whole population.
sample, random,
n a sample drawn by chance; a sample drawn in such a way that every item in the population has an equal and independent chance of being included in the sample.
sample, stratified,
n a sample derived by dividing the population into a number of nonoverlapping classes or categories from which cases are selected at random, the number of cases selected from each category being proportional to the number therein.

sample

1. a specimen of fluid, blood or tissue collected for analysis on the assumption that it represents the composition of the whole.
2. for statistical purposes a small collection of individual units taken from the population which is under investigation on the assumption that they represent the characteristics of the entire population.

EPSEM sample
acronym for 'equal opportunity of selection method'.
grab sample
sample of greasy wool taken at random by a special machine from each bale on the sale floor. Buyers price the bale on the basis of the appearance of the grab sample and the objective measurements.
multi-stage random sample
with very large populations it may be desirable to arrange the data into groups on one criterion, e.g. address by area of postcode, and to select randomly from within this group, then select from within this sample to obtain randomly a representative number of specimens, such as dogs of each age group.
random sample
the selection from a population of the units which are to constitute the sample of that population is made in such a way that each unit of the population has an equal chance of being selected. Called also simple random sample.
simple random sample
see random sample (above).
stratified random sample
the data is arranged into subsets or strata based on the possession of certain characteristics which are common to the members of the subset. The selection of units to comprise the sample of the parent population is arranged so that the proportional representation of each subset in the final sample fits a prearranged schedule.
volunteer sample
sample donated by interested parties; a biased sample because it does not represent all sections of the population. Called also self-selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Weighing the sample in both air and water, followed by a simple calculation, develops a quantitative number that may be used for process control of your degassing/gassing operations.
The shape factor of a sample is the ratio of the area of one compressed face to the area of a sample allowed to expand, as shown in figure 1 (ref.
In addition, we participated in a study in which Monsanto sent 25 urine samples to the CDC for analysis.
Several reasons have been given by these proponents to support their claims that sampling and sample size considerations are not relevant in qualitative research.
Chadwick, who has met several times with USC representatives in recent weeks - including Sample - said he wants USC to help account for the lost revenue.
Prior to such twin-resonator measurements, similar measurements on a single resonator with only the first sample or the second one inserted were also carried out.
The width of the interval is determined by many factors, but the size of the sample is one of the most important.
However, for the forensic scientist to make an accurate determination, investigators should sample all types of material present at the scene.
Because FFTs are more expensive, however, you may want to test a one-shot sample mailing first.
Race and other scientists outlined plans for gathering and retrieving Martian samples at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia in February and at a conference on astrobiology at George Washington University in Washington, D.
Automated sample conditioning is also said to be more consistent than manual methods, another factor leading to more accurate results, according to Rheometrics.
For example, if a degraded sample amplified with the Identifiler kit is missing seven of the 15 loci normally amplified by the kit in a forensic case, the MiniFiler kit complements it by amplifying the same sample to provide results for the seven loci that were not successful.