sample


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sample

 
1. a representative part taken to typify the whole.
2. a subset of a population that is selected for inclusion in a research study.

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl),
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample

Etymology: L, exemplum
(in research) a group or part of the whole that can be used to demonstrate characteristics of the whole. Kinds of samples include cluster, convenience, random, and stratified.

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random (haphazard) or nonrandom, representative or nonrepresentative.
3. A piece or portion of a whole that will demonstrate the characteristics or qualities of that whole.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample

any portion of a whole, such as a small part of a population, collected for examination.

sampling 

The selection of a group of subjects from a population. This is usually done for the purpose of experimentation. The part of the population selected is called the sample: it is usually considered to be representative of a given population. A good sample must be random, i.e. every possible member of that population has an equal chance of being selected. Otherwise, it is said to be biased. Sampling can extend either across geographical areas (spatial sampling) or over a period of time (temporal sampling).

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. Specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. Selected subset of a population; may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]

sample,

n a selected part of a population that is taken to be representative of the whole population.
sample, random,
n a sample drawn by chance; a sample drawn in such a way that every item in the population has an equal and independent chance of being included in the sample.
sample, stratified,
n a sample derived by dividing the population into a number of nonoverlapping classes or categories from which cases are selected at random, the number of cases selected from each category being proportional to the number therein.

sample

1. a specimen of fluid, blood or tissue collected for analysis on the assumption that it represents the composition of the whole.
2. for statistical purposes a small collection of individual units taken from the population which is under investigation on the assumption that they represent the characteristics of the entire population.

EPSEM sample
acronym for 'equal opportunity of selection method'.
grab sample
sample of greasy wool taken at random by a special machine from each bale on the sale floor. Buyers price the bale on the basis of the appearance of the grab sample and the objective measurements.
multi-stage random sample
with very large populations it may be desirable to arrange the data into groups on one criterion, e.g. address by area of postcode, and to select randomly from within this group, then select from within this sample to obtain randomly a representative number of specimens, such as dogs of each age group.
random sample
the selection from a population of the units which are to constitute the sample of that population is made in such a way that each unit of the population has an equal chance of being selected. Called also simple random sample.
simple random sample
see random sample (above).
stratified random sample
the data is arranged into subsets or strata based on the possession of certain characteristics which are common to the members of the subset. The selection of units to comprise the sample of the parent population is arranged so that the proportional representation of each subset in the final sample fits a prearranged schedule.
volunteer sample
sample donated by interested parties; a biased sample because it does not represent all sections of the population. Called also self-selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
A range of sample shapes was molded to evaluate the effect of different configurations and potential constraints, and to note how these responses might also affect their viscoelastic response and tests used to measure their sealing capability.
This suggests that sample size and sampling considerations always are pertinent in qualitative research.
Sample added that removing liability was a factor in his decision, too.
For our interference simulations in the plane wave theory, we extended our previous program [4] prepared with the decomposition of the wave vector to the parallel and the perpendicular components to the sample surface.
For example, if a sample of size 300 achieves 10-percent relative precision on the 100-percent deductible amount using standard statistical estimates, the sample size might jump to 800 or 1,000 to achieve 10-percent relative precision, calculated as specified in the revenue procedure on the amount that moves to 100-percent deductible.
The stereobinocular microscope helps identify the various minerals and mineral sites present in a sample.
Also, it's a good idea for the copy to preview the future content and benefits provocatively, emphasizing that the sample is just a taste, and can you really live without more?
Arguments over the origins of amino acids and other organic compounds in the famous Martian meteorite ALH84001 highlight the problems faced in analyzing fresh samples from Mars, notes Michael H.
Persons estimates are provided for a variety of age/sex categories each with different sample sizes and different sampling errors.
Different factors, such as sample age and environmental factors, affect the degradation of DNA.
To the Editor: From November 2004 to February 2005, a company contracted by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) sent influenza quality assurance samples containing live influenza A H2N2 viruses (A/Japan/305/57) to 3,748 international laboratories (1,2).
These first researchers started with a torn rubber sample and evaluated it with the naked eye.