salvage

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salvage

noun The saving of something.

verb To rescue, or save the remains of, something, often understood to mean the rescue of cargo lost at sea.
References in periodicals archive ?
All of this is haplessly linked to characters' supposed "marks" of sin and a dapper fellow who labors for the Devil as a salvager of souls.
That is, until treasure hunter and shipwreck salvager Scott Mitchen and his team of divers get hold of it.
Canadian Salvager Finds Valuable Logs in New Brunswick River
You see accepting this offer as a way to stop incurring expense and get a hunk of junk off your hands, so you sell it to the salvager and go on to more important things.
For Hemingway, who could begin an article about fishing on the Gulf Stream with this sentence, "Certainly there is no hunting like the hunting of man and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never really care for anything else thereafter" (BL 236), the unnamed salvager of "After the Storm" is the personification of his most profoundly held views.
9) Acting as salvager and medium, Brathwaite summons the "riddim" of popular talk as he renames the gods.
Mandak is the sole salvager of old railway cars in Canada.
76) Crusoe was joined by a number of other antebellum free blacks of relatively modest means who now boasted estates in excess of $5,000-barber Robert Booker, restaurant owner Richard Francis, salvager Palmer Briscoe, and plastering contractor Richard Sanders.
Currently, along with joint-venture partner, renowned treasure explorer and salvager Burt Webber, (http://www.
On the Odyssey Marine a marine salvager specialising in extracting cargoes from sunken ships, Mike Milosh stared into the monitor showing video from the shipwreck more than mile below him.
ISLAMABAD, March 05, 2010 (Balochistan Times): The Charter of Democracy, once dreamt as salvager from decades-old political crises and restoring lost sanctity of the 1973 Constitution, now stands at crossroads, seeking action of both the signatories, as mere word are no more a solution for effective implementation.
Whitelaw, the most important ship salvager of his day, whose adventures in shipping began at age 12 and led him to Mexico, British Columbia, and the Bering Sea.