salt

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salt

 [sawlt]
1. any compound of a base and an acid.
3. in the plural, a saline cathartic.
bile s's glycine or taurine conjugates of bile acids, which are formed in the liver and secreted in the bile. They are powerful detergents that break down fat globules, enabling them to be digested.
buffer salt a salt in the blood that is able to absorb slight excesses of acid or alkali with little or no change in the hydrogen ion concentration.
Epsom salt magnesium sulfate.
Glauber's salt sodium sulfate.
oral rehydration s's (ORS) a dry mixture of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, dextrose, and either sodium citrate or sodium bicarbonate; dissolved in water for use in oral rehydration therapy.
smelling s's aromatic ammonium carbonate, a stimulant and restorative.

salt

(sawlt),
1. A compound formed by the interaction of an acid and a base, the ionizable hydrogen atoms of the acid are replaced by the positive ion of the base.
2. Sodium chloride, the prototypical salt. Synonym(s): table salt
3. A saline cathartic, especially magnesium sulfate, sodium sulfate, or Rochelle salt; often denoted by the plural, salts.
Synonym(s): sal
[L. sal]

salt

(sawlt)
1. sodium chloride, or common salt.
2. any compound of a base and an acid; any compound of an acid some of whose replaceable atoms have been substituted.
3. in the plural, a saline cathartic.

bile salts  conjugates of glycine or taurine with bile acids, formed in the liver and secreted in the bile. They are powerful detergents that break down fat globules, enabling them to be digested.
Epsom salt  magnesium sulfate.
Glauber's salt  sodium sulfate.
oral rehydration salts  (ORS) a dry mixture of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, dextrose, and either sodium citrate or sodium bicarbonate; dissolved in water for use in treatment of dehydration.
smelling salts  aromatized ammonium carbonate; stimulant and restorative.

salt

(sôlt)
n.
1. A colorless or white crystalline solid, chiefly sodium chloride, used as a food seasoning and preservative.
2. A chemical compound replacing all or part of the hydrogen ions of an acid with metal ions or electropositive radicals.
3. salts Any of various mineral salts, such as magnesium sulfate, sodium sulfate, or potassium sodium tartrate, used as laxatives or cathartics.
4. salts Smelling salts.
5. salts Epsom salts.

salt

[sôlt]
Etymology: L, sal
1 a compound formed by the chemical reaction of an acid and a base. Salts are usually composed of a metal cation and a nonmetal anion.
2 sodium chloride (common table salt).
3 a substance, such as magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt), used as a purgative.

SALT

Abbreviation for:
serum alanine aminotransferase
skin-associated lymphoid tissue
speech and language therapist 
speech and language therapy 
Swedish Aspirin Low-dose Trial

SALT

Oncology
1. Sequential aggressive local therapy.
2. Skin-associated lymphoid tissue. See MALT.

salt

(sal) (sawlt)
1. A compound formed by the interaction of an acid and a base, the ionizable hydrogen atoms of the acid being replaced by the positive ion of the base.
2. Sodium chloride, the prototypical salt.
3. A saline cathartic, especially magnesium sulfate, magnesium citrate, or sodium phosphate; often denoted by the plural, salts.
[L. sal]

salt

1. Any substance that dissociates in solution into ions of opposite charge.
2. Common salt, sodium chloride (NaCl).

salt

there has been controversy in the past about the potentially harmful effects of excessive salt intake (specifically the sodium component). A statement from the Faculty of Public Health of the Royal College of Physicians UK has endorsed evidence that intake above the recommended maximum of 6 g per day for adults (less for children, proportional to age group) is strongly linked to the development of hypertension, and is therefore in turn a risk factor for coronary artery disease and stroke, whereas the average intake over the population is closer to 9 g per day. More than 6 g per day is, however, likely to be appropriate for athletes whose training or competition involves excessive sweating. Salt in the diet (apart from added table salt and that used in cooking) is derived mostly from processed food and there are also other minor sources of sodium. See also sodium, minerals, water balance; appendix 4.3 .

salt

chemical compound formed by interaction of an acid with a base

salt

(sawlt)
1. Compound formed by interaction of an acid and a base, the ionizable hydrogen atoms of the acid are replaced by the positive ion of the base.
2. Sodium chloride.
[L. sal]

salt (sôlt),

n a compound of a base and an acid; a compound of an acid, some of the replaceable hydrogen atoms of which have been substituted.
salt, basic,
n a salt containing replaceable, or hydroxyl, groups.
salt depletion,
salt solution,
n a homemade mouthrinse consisting of one-half teaspoon salt and one-half cup of tepid water, used to decrease inflammation and promote healing.

SALT

see skin-associated lymphoid tissues.

salt

1. any compound of a base and an acid.
2. salts, a saline purgative. See also sodium chloride.

bile s's
glycine or taurine conjugates of bile acids, which are formed in the liver and secreted in the bile. They are powerful detergents which break down fat globules, enabling them to be digested.
salt brine
strong solution of common salt used to pickle meat and other human foods. Sodium chloride is the biggest component but large quantities of nitrate are usually present and represent a greater toxicity hazard than does the salt.
buffer salt
a salt in the blood that is able to absorb slight excesses of acid or alkali with little or no change in the hydrogen ion concentration.
common salt
see sodium chloride.
salt gland
nasal gland in birds.
salt hunger
common in circumstances in which animals are derived of any salt; manifested by leather chewing, earth eating, coat licking and urine drinking.
salt lick
1. naturally occurring deposit of salt in the form of a shallow pan that wild and domestic animals can share by licking.
2. a prepared mixture of salt with other minerals added, the composition varying with the local nutritional deficiency but the common additive is one containing phosphorus. The cattle or sheep are encouraged to lick by the taste of the salt and serendipitously acquire the other minerals. May be loose and put out in containers covered against the weather or formed into blocks that resist rain erosion and are fitted into holders fixed to buildings or free-standing in the pasture. See also mineral-salt mixture.
Rochelle salt
potassium sodium tartrate, a cathartic.
salt sick
see copper nutritional deficiency.
smelling s's
aromatic ammonium carbonate, a stimulant and restorative.
salt tolerant
capable of surviving in a high concentration of salt, e.g. some bacteria, including staphylococci.

Patient discussion about salt

Q. What steps do you take when your physician says your sodium is low

A. Drugs That May Be Prescribed By Your Doctor for Hyponatremia(low sodium):

Sodium levels must be corrected carefully. If your blood test results indicate you have a very low sodium level, your healthcare provider will cautiously correct the levels, to a "safe level."

Intravenous (IV) fluids with a high-concentration of sodium, and/or diuretics to raise your blood sodium levels.

Loop Diuretics - also known as "water pills" as they work to raise blood sodium levels, by making you urinate out extra fluid. The fluid that is lost (called "free water") is usually replaced with an IV solution that contains a high level of sodium.

A common example of this type of medication is Furosemide (e.g Lasix). You may receive this medication alone or in combination with other medications.

More discussions about salt
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