uterine tube

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tube

 [to̳b]
a hollow cylindrical organ or instrument. adj., adj tu´bal.
auditory tube eustachian tube.
Blakemore-Sengstaken tube Sengstaken-Blakemore tube.
chest tube see chest tube.
Dobhoff tube a small-lumen feeding tube that can be advanced into the duodenum.
drainage tube a tube used in surgery to facilitate escape of fluids.
Drieling tube a double-lumen tube having a metal weight at one end to carry it past the stomach into the duodenum. At the other end are two tails, one used to collect gastric specimens and the other to collect specimens from the duodenum. The tube is used in the secretin test for pancreatic exocrine function.
Durham's tube a jointed tracheostomy tube.
endobronchial tube a single- or double-lumen tube inserted into the bronchus of one lung and sealed with an inflatable cuff, permitting ventilation of the intubated lung and complete deflation of the other lung; used in anesthesia and thoracic surgery.
endotracheal tube see endotracheal tube.
esophageal tube stomach tube.
eustachian tube see eustachian tube.
Ewald tube a large lumen tube used in gastric lavage.
fallopian tube see fallopian tube.
feeding tube one for introducing high-caloric fluids into the stomach; see also tube feeding.
tube feeding a means of providing nutrition via a feeding tube inserted into the gastrointestinal tract; it may be done to maintain nutritional status over a period of time or as a treatment for malnutrition. It can be used as the only source of nutrition or as a supplement to oral feeding or parenteral nutrition.

Patients who may require tube feeding include those unable to take in an adequate supply of nutrients by mouth because of the side effects of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, those with depression or some other psychiatric disorder, and those suffering from severe hypermetabolic states such as burns or sepsis, or malabsorption syndromes. Other conditions that may require tube feeding include surgery or trauma to the oropharynx, esophageal fistula, and impaired swallowing such as that which occurs following stroke or that related to neuromuscular paralysis.

There are commercially prepared formulas for tube feeding. Some contain all six necessary nutrients (carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements) and need no supplement as long as they are given in sufficient volume to meet nutritional and caloric needs. Other types of tube feeding formulas are incomplete and therefore will require some supplementation. Choice of formula is based on the patient's particular needs, presence of organ failure or metabolic aberration, lactose tolerance, gastrointestinal function, and how and where the feeding is to be given, that is, via nasogastric, gastrostomy, or enterostomy tube.
Patient Care. In addition to frequent and periodic checking for tube placement and monitoring of gastric residuals to prevent aspiration, other maintenance activities include monitoring effectiveness of the feeding and assessing the patient's tolerance to the tube and the feeding. Special mouth care is essential to maintain a healthy oral mucosa. A summary of the complications related to tube feeding, their causes and contributing factors, and interventions to treat or prevent each complication is presented in the accompanying table.
fermentation tube a U-shaped tube with one end closed, for determining gas production by bacteria.
Levin tube a gastroduodenal catheter of sufficiently small caliber to permit transnasal passage; see illustration.
Two types of nasogastric tubes. From Ignatavicius et al., 1995.
Linton tube a triple-lumen tube with a single balloon used to control hemorrhage from esophageal varices. Once it is positioned under fluoroscopic control and inflated, the balloon exerts pressure against the submucosal venous network at the cardioesophageal junction, thus restricting the flow of blood to the esophageal varices.
Miller-Abbott tube see miller-abbott tube.
Minnesota tube a tube with four lumens, used in treatment of esophageal varices; having a lumen for aspiration of esophageal secretions is its major difference from the sengstaken-blakemore tube.
nasogastric tube see nasogastric tube.
nasotracheal tube an endotracheal tube that passes through the nose.
neural tube the epithelial tube produced by folding of the neural plate in the early embryo.
orotracheal tube an endotracheal tube that passes through the mouth.
otopharyngeal tube eustachian tube.
Rehfuss tube a single-lumen oral tube used to obtain specimens of biliary secretions for diagnostic study; it is weighted on one end so that it can be passed through the mouth and positioned at the point where the bile duct empties into the duodenum. See also biliary drainage test.
Salem sump tube a double-lumen nasogastric tube used for suction and irrigation of the stomach. One lumen is attached to suction for the drainage of gastric contents and the second lumen is an air vent. See illustration.
Sengstaken-Blakemore tube see sengstaken-blakemore tube.
stomach tube see stomach tube.
T-tube one shaped like the letter T and inserted into the biliary tract to allow for drainage of bile; it is generally left in place for 10 days or more in order to develop a tract through which bile can drain after the tube is removed. A T-tube cholangiogram is usually performed prior to removal of the tube in order to determine that the common duct is patent and free of stones. If stones are found they can be removed through the tube tract by instruments inserted under x-ray guidance.
test tube a tube of thin glass, closed at one end; used in chemical tests and other laboratory procedures.
thoracostomy tube a tube inserted through an opening in the chest wall, for application of suction to the pleural cavity; used to drain fluid or blood or to reexpand the lung in pneumothorax. See also chest tube.
tracheal tube endotracheal tube.
tracheostomy tube a curved endotracheal tube that is inserted into the trachea through a tracheostomy; see discussion under tracheostomy.
tympanostomy tube ventilation tube.
uterine tube fallopian tube.
ventilation tube a tube inserted after myringotomy in chronic cases of middle ear effusion, such as in secretory or mucoid otitis media; it provides ventilation and drainage for the middle ear during healing, and is eventually extruded. Called also tympanostomy tube.
Tympanostomy (ventilation) tube. Polyethylene tubes are inserted surgically into the eardrum to relieve middle ear pressure and promote drainage of chronic or recurrent middle ear infections. Tubes extrude spontaneously in 6 months to 1 year. From Jarvis, 1996.
Wangensteen tube a small nasogastric tube connected with a special suction apparatus to maintain gastric and duodenal decompression.
Whelan-Moss T-tube a t-tube whose crossbar tube is larger in diameter than the drainage tube.
x-ray tube a glass vacuum bulb containing two electrodes; electrons are obtained either from gas in the tube or from a heated cathode. When suitable potential is applied, electrons travel at high velocity from cathode to anode, where they are suddenly arrested, giving rise to x-rays.

u·ter·ine tube

[TA]
one of the tubes leading on either side from the upper or outer extremity of the ovary, which is largely enveloped by its expanded infundibulum, to the fundus of the uterus; it provides the path by which the ovum travels from ovary to uterus where, if it is fertilized in the tube, it will implant as a zygote; it consists of infundibulum, ampulla, isthmus, and uterine parts.

uterine tube

u·ter·ine tube

(yū'tĕr-in tūb) [TA]
One of the tubes leading on either side from the upper or outer extremity of the ovary, which is largely enveloped by its expanded infundibulum, to the fundus of the uterus; it consists of infundibulum, ampulla, isthmus, and uterine parts.
Synonym(s): salpinx (1) [TA] , fallopian tube, gonaduct (2) , oviduct.

Fallopius,

Gabriele, Italian anatomist, 1523-1562.
fallopian aqueduct - the bony passage in the temporal bone through which the facial nerve passes. Synonym(s): facial canal; fallopian canal
fallopian arch - Synonym(s): fallopian ligament
fallopian artery
fallopian canal - Synonym(s): fallopian aqueduct
fallopian cannula
fallopian catheter
fallopian hiatus - the opening on the anterior aspect of the petrous part of the temporal bone which leads to the facial canal and gives passage to the greater petrosal nerve. Synonym(s): hiatus of facial canal
fallopian ligament - forms the floor of the inguinal canal and gives origin to lowermost fibers of internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles. Synonym(s): fallopian arch; inguinal ligament
fallopian neuritis - Synonym(s): facial paralysis
fallopian pregnancy - Synonym(s): tubal pregnancy
fallopian tube - one of the tubes leading on either side from the upper or outer extremity of the ovary to the fundus of the uterus. Synonym(s): tuba fallopiana; tuba fallopii; uterine tube;
tuba fallopiana - Synonym(s): fallopian tube
tuba fallopii - Synonym(s): fallopian tube

uterine

pertaining to the uterus; see also endometrium, endometrial.

uterine abscess
most common in cattle and in dorsal wall due to injury during insemination or intrauterine therapy for infertility or instrumental obstetric manipulation.
uterine accommodation limited
may contribute to flexural deformities of limbs especially in foals; obesity of the dam may contribute to the limitation.
uterine artery rupture
occurs during parturition, and often accompanies uterine prolapse in cows. There is marked mucosal pallor and death occurs quickly due to hemorrhagic anemia. In mares, rupture of the middle uterine artery causes hemorrhage, colic, and often, death.
uterine caruncle
see uterine caruncle.
uterine cervix
see cervix uteri.
uterine discharge
copious, foul-smelling discharge in postpartum septic metritis in cows; thick, white, small volume discharge in endometritis.
uterine displacement
includes torsion, downward deviation in sows, inguinal and ventral hernia, prolapse.
uterine distention
palpable per rectum in cows, mares, through the abdominal wall in cats and dogs; pregnancy the common cause, pyometra, accumulation of secretions in imperforate hymen rarely. Pregnancy distinguishable in cows and mares by presence of membranes, or cotyledons in cows or fetus or fremitus in middle uterine artery.
uterine downward displacement
occurs in deep-bodied, pregnant sows with large litters and dystocia results.
uterine expulsive deficiency
see uterine inertia (below).
uterine gland
simple or branched, tubular glands extending into the lamina propria-submucosa; secrete mucus, lipids, glycogen, protein.
uterine horn
one of the pair of tubular extensions from the uterine body. Amongst the domestic species the horns are largest in those that bear many young (polytocous), e.g. sows, bitches, and shorter in those that bear single young (unitocous). Birds have two but only the left one is well developed or functional.
uterine inertia
primary, due to overstretching of the uterus or toxemia or obesity, or secondary, due to exhaustion, lack of myometrial contractions.
uterine infection
uterine involution
return to normal size after the delivery of the fetus.
uterine involution failure
common sequel to normal parturition in aged, high-producing cows, especially those suffering from milk fever or ketosis; metritis is a common sequel.
uterine lochia
see lochia.
uterine malformation
includes uterus didelphys, uterus unicornis and segmental aplasia of any part of the tubular organ.
uterine milk
secretions of the uterine endometrium in the early part of pregnancy; sustains the fetus until placental attachments are fully functional.
uterine mucosa
endometrium.
uterine neoplasm
uncommon but fibroleiomyoma occurs in bitches, leiomyoma and lymphosarcoma in cows.
uterine prolapse
see uterine prolapse.
uterine rupture
occurs usually during parturition and due to human intervention. Repairable if recognized but may lead to peritonitis.
uterine sand
dry, inspissated granules, yellow in color, found occasionally on the exterior of the bovine placenta. Probably derived from blood leaked into the lumen of the uterus in early pregnancy.
uterine stump granuloma
chronic inflammation due to infection or nonabsorbable sutures used in closing the stump after ovariohysterectomy.
uterine swab
swab of the uterus for bacteriological and virological examination for pathogens likely to adversely affect fertility. Used in fertility maintenance of mares.
uterine torsion
torsion of the body of the uterus in cows and mares and of a horn of the uterus in the sow. Causes dystocia characterized by the nonappearance of any part of the fetus in the vulva. Occurs rarely in dogs and cats.
uterine tube
a slender tube extending from the uterus to the ovary on the same side, conveying ova to the cavity of the uterus and permitting passage of spermatozoa in the opposite direction. It is mostly suspended in a fold of peritoneum (mesosalpinx) that may enclose a cavity (ovarian bursa). It terminates at the ovarian end in a dilated funnel (infundibulum). Called also fallopian tube and oviduct.
When the mature ovum leaves the ovary it enters the fringed opening of the uterine tube, through which it travels slowly to the uterus. When conception takes place, the tube is usually the site of fertilization.
uterine tube occlusion
may be congenital, or constricted by scar tissue in chronic peritonitis; a rare cause of infertility.

Patient discussion about uterine tube

Q. She had an infection in her fallopian tubes. She is recovering now, but can she get pregnant again? My sister had a very bad pregnancy where she had lost her first child. She had an infection in her fallopian tubes. As it was an ectopic pregnancy, she had an operation where they made a small incision in the fallopian tube and removed the embryo. She was depressed for quite a while as she was looking forward to enjoying her new baby. She is recovering now, but can she get pregnant again?

A. i think that was an ectopic pregnancy. of course she can get pregnant again, although the past history of tubal pregnancy increases the risk of developing another ectopic pregnancy in the future. but don't worry, all your sister need to is always consult her health and future-pregnancy condition with her ob-gyn specialist.

i believe that what happened to your sister was non-complicated ectopic pregnancy, because the doctor was just doing the minimal invasive surgery in her fallopian tube. it still has the risks of having another ectopic one in her future pregnancy, but with a complete medical check-up and work-up, i'm sure she will just be doing well.

i just wrote a brief note about ectopic pregnancy, in case you want to read that :
http://doctoradhi.com/blog/2009/01/ectopic-pregnancy/

More discussions about uterine tube