sage

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sal·vi·a

(sal'vē-ă),
The dried leaves of Salvia officinalis (family Labiatae), garden or meadow sage; it inhibits secretory activity, especially of the sweat glands, and was also formerly used in treatment of bronchitis and inflammation of the throat.
Synonym(s): sage
[L.]

sage

(sāj) Salvia officinalis, an herb whose leaves contain a volatile oil and are sudorific, carminative, and astringent; they are used as an antisecretory agent in hyperhidrosis, sialorrhea, pharyngitis, and bronchitis.

sage

Herbal medicine
A perennial evergreen, the leaves of which contain oestrogen-like substances, flavonoids, phenolic acids, tannins and volatile oils (borneol, camphor, cineole, pinene, thujone and others). Sage has a long history of medicinal use and was regarded as a cure-all. It is antibacterial, antispasmodic, carminative and tonic; it has been used for colds, constipation, indigestion, painful menses, hot flashes, as a gargle for sore throat and tonsillitis, and as a poultice for ulcers, sores and skin eruptions. It is believed to improve memory, relax nerves and quell “vicious sexual desires”.

Toxicity
Sage should not be taken during pregnancy or by those with seizures.

SAGE

Geriatrics
1. A clinical study–Study Assessing Goals in the Elderly.
2. A population-based dataset–Systematic Assessment of Geriatric Drug Use via Epidemiology–that contains data on nursing home Pts and combines information from the MDS–Minimum Data Set and the On-Line Survey & Certification Automated Record. See Geriatrics.

sage

The plant Salvia officinalis long claimed to promote health and long life, the extract of which (LEMON BALM) has recently shown some promise of improving the state of patients with ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE. Cur moriartur homo, ciu salvia crescit in horto? (Why die when you have sage in the garden?)

sage,

n Salvia officinalis; parts used: whole plant; uses: menstrual complaints, diarrhea, sore throat, gum disease, gastrointestinal disorders; precautions: uterine stimulant, pregnancy, lactation, children, diabetes mellitus, seizure disorders. Also called
Dalmatian, garden sage, meadow sage, scarlet sage, tree sage, common sage, true sage, or
broad-leafed sage.
Enlarge picture
Sage.

sage

artemisiafilifolia, A. spinescens.

sage sickness
unspecified poisoning by Artemisia spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
how are we to interpret the incident at Tiananmen as a democratic revolt if in our democracy there is a prevailing conception of personhood that entails natural rights, free choice, independence, autonomy, and so on, while in China such values, far from being self-evident and normative, have traditionally been regarded by even the sagest Chinese as sociopathic?
When asked about the best lesson Americans learned from financial planning assistance, the greatest number of respondents (20 percent of workers; 19 percent of retirees) said diversifying their portfolio was the sagest advice.
So the sagest advice is probably to keep your powder dry until the two cuts have been made and the elite field of 32 is whittled down to eight, otherwise you might not even have a runner when the crunch comes.