sacrifice

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sacrifice

(sak′rĭ-fīs″) [L. sacrificare, to make or offer a sacrifice]
1. To give up or yield something of value.
2. To experience a loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the sacrificer is identified with the offering now encompassed by the god, the sacrificer has become, temporarily, a token of the god.
One must also carry out ritual sacrifice to divinities, as the very act of proper sacrifice establishes formal communication between the human and the relevant spirits, providing specific divinities with an occasion on which to enjoy and bestow favor upon the sacrificer, or to reject and punish him or her.
Though crude equations of physiology with ritual are suspect, the author presents this hypothesis with subtlety and a wealth of supporting detail, and the fact that the sacrifice is identified with or measured by the sacrificer elsewhere in Vedic ritual makes it not intrinsically unlikely.
On this matter, it is worth noting here that when the sacrificer reaches the top of the sacrificial post in the Vajapeya rite, he gazes back down upon the ground in the same way as, in the normal post rite, the adhvaryu (and the sacrificer) gaze up at the top of the post.
Sacrificers: Sacrificers are more likely than others to switch to store brands and only 16 percent describe themselves as brand loyal; however, these compromises are accompanied by feeling of resentment.
The sacrificers should get approval of authorised slaughterhouses prior to the slaughter and get the meat inspected to ensure safety and protect health.
The procession of sacrificers slowly moves forward and enters the Temple grounds.
or a sign ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), but also filled the palace with sacrificers, and purifiers and diviners.
Mitchell-Boyask, however, implicitly rejects the view that Polyxena's acquiescence actually aids her sacrificers, arguing that both the Greeks' motives and Polyxena's render the sacrifice ineffectual.
Jurisprudentially, these terrorist sacrificers are hostes humani generis, international outlaws within the scope of universal jurisdiction.
Further he looks to those who recognize that it is not the priesthood as a part of modern bureaucratic organization but priests as the sacrificers who help free believers to be enriched by the sacrament of the Eucharist and are the key to the spiritual development that should be the goal of organized religion.