sacral nerves


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Related to sacral nerves: sacral plexus, obturator nerve, nerve supply, ilioinguinal nerve, Lumbar nerves

sacral nerves

the five segmental nerves from the sacral part of the spinal cord. The first four emerge through the anterior sacral foramina and the fifth from between the sacral foramen and the coccyx.

sacral nerves

Five pairs of spinal nerves, the upper four of which emerge through the posterior sacral foramina, the fifth pair through the sacral hiatus (termination of the sacral canal). All are mixed nerves (motor and sensory).

Sacral nerves

The five pairs of nerves that arise from the lowermost segments of the spinal cord and control bladder, bowel, and pelvic functions. Stimulation of the sacral nerves by an implanted device is a newer treatment for urinary incontinence.
Mentioned in: Urinary Incontinence
References in periodicals archive ?
centers, one in Canada and one in Australia, who were candidates for sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence.
Medium-term outcome of sacral nerve modulation for constipation.
Sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence and constipation in adults: a short version Cochrane review.
They were then divided into a control group (26 people) who received standard medical treatment and a stimulation group (25 people) that received sacral nerve stimulation via Medtronic InterStim(R) Therapy for Urinary Control.
This study confirms that sacral nerve stimulation can make a dramatic difference in the lives of people who suffer from urgency-frequency," said Magdy M.
In addition, the panel recommended that given the potential benefits, sacral nerve stimulation should be included in all female urology and incontinence training programs.
Food and Drug Administration's approval of an accurate screening test to identify people who may benefit from InterStim(R) Therapy for Urinary Control, a treatment for intractable voiding dysfunction that uses an implanted medical device akin to a cardiac pacemaker to deliver sacral nerve stimulation.
The stimulator is attached to a pacer electrode that is placed through the skin of the patient's lower back, where it generates an electrical pulse to the sacral nerves.
The therapy, a minimally invasive procedure, works by applying electrical stimulation to the sacral nerves (located at the base of the spine) via a totally implantable system, including a lead and pulse generator, or pacemaker-like device.
The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of sacral nerve stimulation in treating urinary urge incontinence.
Control patients underwent standard medical therapy for six months and thereafter could cross over to the implant group, to receive sacral nerve stimulation therapy.