saccharin


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Related to saccharin: aspartame

saccharin

 [sak´ah-rin]
a white, crystalline compound several hundred times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sweetening agent, but now proved to be carcinogenic in test animals.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin),
In dilute aqueous solution it is 300-500 times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sweetening agent (sugar substitute); saccharin sodium and saccharin calcium have the same use.
Synonym(s): benzosulfimide

saccharin

/sac·cha·rin/ (sak´ah-rin) a white, crystalline compound several hundred times sweeter than sucrose; used as the base or the calcium or sodium salt as a flavor and nonnutritive sweetener.

saccharin

[sak′ərin]
Etymology: Gk, sakcharon, sugar
1 n, a white crystalline synthetic sweetening agent derived from coal tar. Although it is up to 500 times as sweet as sugar, it has no food value.
2 adj, having a sweet taste, especially cloyingly sweet. Also called saccharine [-rīn, -rin] .

saccharin

The cyclic imine of 2-sulfobenzoic acid, which is 500 times sweeter than sugar, used as an artificial sweetener.

Saccharin causes bladder tumours in rats if given in “mega” doses, and was temporarily withdrawn from the market; one pack of Sweet ‘n Low (a sugar substitute) contains 40 mg of saccharin.

saccharin

Nutrition A cyclic imine of 2-sulfobenzoic acid, which is 500 times sweeter than sugar, and used as an artificial sweetener. See Artificial sweeteners. Cf Aspartame, Sweet protein.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin)
In dilute aqueous solution it is 300-500 times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sugar substitute.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin)
Noncaloric sweetening agent (sugar substitute).

saccharin,

n the chemical sweetener benzosulfimide, which is 300 to 500 times as sweet as sucrose. Tests have demonstrated that large amounts may cause cancers in experimental animals. It is no longer in general use as a low-calorie sweetener.
Saccharomyces
n a genus of yeast fungi, including brewer's and baker's yeast, as well as some pathogenic fungi, that cause such diseases as bronchitis, moniliasis, and pharyngitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Complete report on global saccharin market (artificial sweetener) spread across 142 pages, talking about 12 saccharin manufacturing companies and supported with 200 tables and figures is now available at http://www.
However, the mice fed aspartame appeared to have little or no glucose intolerance, and saccharin and sucralose affected only some "responders.
Though the finding is preliminary, four of seven human volunteers eating a diet high in saccharin developed impaired glucose metabolism, a warning sign for type 2 diabetes.
This aversion memory was then slowly extinguished by repeated exposure to saccharin alone.
2% saccharin solution in the drinking tubes and then immediately placed into the container of water for 5 min, after which they were towel dried and returned to the home cage.
This flavoring substance could be broadly used to improve the palatability of foods and beverages containing acesulfame K and saccharin.
In samples taken from four German rivers, concentrations of acesulfame exceeded 2 [micro]g/L, whereas concentrations of sucralose, cyclamate, and saccharin were an order of magnitude lower.
Noon, with little time for lunch, he runs out to a nearby fast-food cafeteria (artificial restaurant) and wolfs down a hamburger and soda (contents: calcium cyclamate, phosphoric acid, saccharin and artificial flavorings).
Zero-calorie NutraSweet New Pink has the richer, sweeter taste to which many people have grown accustomed from the familiar "pink" packaged sweetener, but without the saccharin.
Today's ready-to-drink tea options range from overly- sweetened national brands to organic options lacking in flavor, and diet soft drinks loaded with saccharin or aspartame, artificial flavors and preservatives are not exactly the picture of health.
Saccharin, the oldest artificial sweetener, was first produced in 1879.