saccharin


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Related to saccharin: aspartame

saccharin

 [sak´ah-rin]
a white, crystalline compound several hundred times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sweetening agent, but now proved to be carcinogenic in test animals.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin),
In dilute aqueous solution it is 300-500 times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sweetening agent (sugar substitute); saccharin sodium and saccharin calcium have the same use.
Synonym(s): benzosulfimide

saccharin

/sac·cha·rin/ (sak´ah-rin) a white, crystalline compound several hundred times sweeter than sucrose; used as the base or the calcium or sodium salt as a flavor and nonnutritive sweetener.

saccharin

[sak′ərin]
Etymology: Gk, sakcharon, sugar
1 n, a white crystalline synthetic sweetening agent derived from coal tar. Although it is up to 500 times as sweet as sugar, it has no food value.
2 adj, having a sweet taste, especially cloyingly sweet. Also called saccharine [-rīn, -rin] .

saccharin

The cyclic imine of 2-sulfobenzoic acid, which is 500 times sweeter than sugar, used as an artificial sweetener.

Saccharin causes bladder tumours in rats if given in “mega” doses, and was temporarily withdrawn from the market; one pack of Sweet ‘n Low (a sugar substitute) contains 40 mg of saccharin.

saccharin

Nutrition A cyclic imine of 2-sulfobenzoic acid, which is 500 times sweeter than sugar, and used as an artificial sweetener. See Artificial sweeteners. Cf Aspartame, Sweet protein.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin)
In dilute aqueous solution it is 300-500 times sweeter than sucrose; used as a noncaloric sugar substitute.

sac·cha·rin

(sak'ă-rin)
Noncaloric sweetening agent (sugar substitute).

saccharin,

n the chemical sweetener benzosulfimide, which is 300 to 500 times as sweet as sucrose. Tests have demonstrated that large amounts may cause cancers in experimental animals. It is no longer in general use as a low-calorie sweetener.
Saccharomyces
n a genus of yeast fungi, including brewer's and baker's yeast, as well as some pathogenic fungi, that cause such diseases as bronchitis, moniliasis, and pharyngitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic analyses of the gut microbes from mice fed on saccharin found they were breaking down more carbohydrate in the diet than normal.
At set I, poison baiting impregnated with coumatetralyl and supplemented with saccharin was tested; in set II, poison baiting without saccharin was applied; and in set III, control bait was offered.
The sides on which the saccharin and water cylinders were presented were counterbalanced for each group.
Agency for Research on Cancer reevaluated the scientific information on saccharin and its salts and concluded that saccharin and its salts are not potential human carcinogens.
Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity to the urinary bladder of sodium saccharin in the in utero-exposed rat.
Weleda makes a toothpaste free of saccharin and sodium lauryl sulfate.
The Calorie Control Council, which called for saccharin to be taken off the list, said it was wrong and misleading to list the sweetener as a cancer-causing agent.
The NTP panel recommended that saccharin remain listed in its "Report on Carcinogens" despite strong arguments that the sweetener cannot be shown to increase cancer risks in humans.
Some sugar substitutes, like saccharin, have no calories because they're not burned for energy in the body's cells.
The company's first product was the artificial sweetener saccharin, which it sold to the Coca-Cola Company.
And, like all Kolorz products, ClearShield is gluten free and contains no saccharin or aspartame.