running economy


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running economy

defined as the volume of oxygen required per km, relative to body mass, to run at a submaximal speed, so expressed in mL.kg-1.km-1. Most commonly reported, however, in terms of the rate of oxygen usage relative to body mass, in mL.kg-1.min-1, in a run at a standard speed of 16 km per hour: note the lower the value, the greater the 'economy'.
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After doing this seven-day cycle three times, or for three weeks, the runners increased their running economy - the steady-state consumption of oxygen (VO2) and the respiratory exchange ratio - and improved their 10K time by an average of 73 seconds.
2max], anaerobic threshold and running economy are directly related to performance (Bassett and Howley, 2000; Larsen, 2003).
Even if mountain ultra-marathoners could sacrifice Cr in order to minimize lower limb tissue damages (4), performance would remain dependent on running economy, particularly on positive slopes that represent an important part of the total race time.
2] max and peak treadmill velocity, due to the improved running economy (21).
Factors affecting running economy in trained distance runners.
2]max at lactate/ventilatory threshold and running economy, often expressed at the cost of running (CR) or V[O.
25) Previous studies investigating resistance training and running performance found increased running economy (24,26,27) and improved running performance when resistance training was incorporated into their training program.
Object of the contract includes services directly related to running economy lesnejprzewidziane to perform in 2014 at the Forestry Commission Baligrod - nursery farm.
This indicates greater running economy which is an important determinant of distance running performance.
This indicates greater running economy, a determinant of distance running performance.
Moderating the good news about running economy, Quinn and his colleagues found that maintaining this running economy came at a higher "cost" to senior runners.
Findings from this research indicate that although the maximal aerobic capacity of elite Black South African and East African runners is lower than that of the elite Caucasian European runners, they have better running economy and fractional utilization of oxygen (Weston et al.