seed

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seed

 [sēd]
1. the mature ovule of a flowering plant.
2. semen.
3. a small cylindrical shell of gold or other suitable material, used in application of radiation therapy.
4. to inoculate a culture medium with microorganisms.
plantago seed (plantain seed) (psyllium seed) cleaned, dried ripe seed of species of Plantago; used as a bulk-forming laxative.
radon seed a small sealed container for radon, for insertion into the tissues of the body in radiotherapy.

seed

(sēd),
1. The reproductive body of a flowering plant; the mature ovule. Synonym(s): semen (2)
2. In bacteriology, to inoculate a culture medium with microorganisms.
[A.S. soed]

seed

(sēd)
1. the mature ovule of a flowering plant.
2. a small cylindrical shell of gold or other suitable material, used in application of radiation therapy.
3. to inoculate a culture medium with microorganisms.

grape seed  a preparation of the seeds of grapes, having antioxidant, antimutagenic, and antiinflammatory properties; used for the prevention of atherosclerosis and cancer and in folk medicine for the treatment of circulatory disorders.
plantago seed , psyllium seed cleaned, dried ripe seed of species of Plantago; used as a bulk-forming laxative.

seed

(sēd)
n.
1. A mature plant ovule containing an embryo.
2. A cell that disperses, especially a cancer cell that spreads from a primary tumor to another location in the body.
3. A pellet filled with a radioactive isotope that is implanted at the site of a cancerous tumor to provide localized administration of radiation.
4. Sperm; semen.
v.
1. To inoculate a culture medium with microorganisms.
2. To disperse, as cancer cells.

seed

Microbiology
verb
(1) To disseminate, as in the seeding of an infection or malignancy.
(2) To inoculate a culture plate with a clinical specimen; the verb plate is generally preferred.

Radiation oncology
noun A cylindrical pellet containing radioactive material, used to deliver local RT; See Brachytherapy, 125I radioactive seeds.

seed

Radiation oncology.noun A cylindrical pellet containing radioactive material, used to deliver local RT. See Brachytherapy, 125I radioactive seed verb
1. To disseminate, as in the seeding of an infection or malignancy.
2. To inoculate a culture plate with a clinical specimen; generally, plate is preferred.

seed

(sēd)
1. The reproductive body of a flowering plant; the mature ovule.
Synonym(s): semen (2) .
2. bacteriology To inoculate a culture medium with microorganisms.
[A.S. soed]
Fig. 278 Seed. Longitudinal sections of (a) broad bean seed, (b) a maize fruit ‘seed’.click for a larger image
Fig. 278 Seed . Longitudinal sections of (a) broad bean seed, (b) a maize fruit ‘seed’.

seed

the structure formed in the fertilized ovule of an ANGIOSPERM, consisting of an embryo surrounded by a food store for nourishment during germination, with an outer hard seed coat, the TESTA. The food store can be located either in a special area called the ENDOSPERM with an outer ALEURONE layer or within the cotyledons, the number of which determines whether a plant is a MONOCOTYLEDON or a DICOTYLEDON. In some plants the so-called seed is really a fruit in which the PERICARP is fused with the testa.

seed

1. the mature ovule of a flowering plant.
2. semen.
3. a small cylindrical shell of gold or other suitable material, used in application of radiation therapy.
4. to inoculate a culture medium with microorganisms.

seed dressing
chemicals mixed with seed grain to prevent infestion with insects and rodents and infection by fungi. Most are poisonous to animals and deaths may occur if the grain is not used as seed and is put back into the animal feed chain. The amount of feed in a collection of seed is usually very large and the probability is that it would be fed without dilution which would reduce its toxicity. Grain or grain products are also used as bait for birds, or to repel birds and to poison snails and other garden pests and all of them may be accessible to animals.
seed grain
cereal grain intended to be used as seed for a crop.
seed mixtures
mixtures of small grass and cereal seeds used as feed for companion birds. Some of the seeds used are the millets, chopped oat groats, canary grass (Phalaris spp.) seed, sunflower seed, hemp seed, rape seed.
plantago seed, plantain seed, psyllium seed
cleaned, dried ripe seed of species of Plantago; used as a cathartic.
radon seed
a small sealed container for radon, for insertion into the tissues of the body in radiotherapy.
seed tick
larval form, the stage prior to the nymph.

Patient discussion about seed

Q. Is it true that tomato seeds, eggplant seeds and the like are prone to causing appendicitis? Is it true that eating tomato with the seeds, eggplant with the seeds and the like are prone to causing appendicitis? Thanks again guys. You're all great.

A. No. Things with seeds are irritants to a condition called diverticulitis where pockets in the intestines become inflamed. the seeds sort of deposit there and become infected. Appendicitis is just an inflammation of your appendix plain and simple, no particular cause is really pinpointed.

Q. am allergic to all nuts and seeds, is it possible to be allergic to all legumes as well ie soy beans

A. Yes, it's possible, although not extremely common. You can read more here (http://www.emedicinehealth.com/food_allergy/page2_em.htm)

More discussions about seed
References in periodicals archive ?
Mulch with well-rotted manure or compost to retain moisture and ensure that they are kept well watered, or they will run to seed.
So many gardeners see all their work go to pot when they are away from home in the summer, as containers dry out, lawns go brown and many plants run to seed in their absence.
Sedums, commonly known as stonecrop or ice plants, are favourites of both bees and butterflies, which provide a rich source of nectar, flowering in late summer when many other flowers have run to seed.
Water the plants regularly and give them a liquid feed every few weeks, removing yellowing leaves and replacing the plants when they run to seed.
Doctor" John Reid, my other former researcher, is nowadays to be found in the Westminster tea-rooms like a prize-fighter run to seed, which in a way is what he is.
Someone who once knew better times but is now down on his luck, a rather tragic figure, a professional run to seed, that kind of thing.
Stettinus, the American Secretary of State; dour, enigmatic Andrei Gromyko and Secretary-General Trygve Lie, a clumsy and confused diplomat with the massive physique of an athlete who had run to seed in middle age, "apt to go dark red in the face with rage and utter, jowls quivering, complex and ominous Norwegian oaths," according ing to an aide.
What is the problem if the grass is a foot high as long as our wild flowers are allowed to mature and run to seed to multiply next spring?