ruminative


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ru·mi·na·tive

(rū'mi-nā'tiv),
Characterized by a preoccupation with certain thoughts and ideas.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, only the Ruminative subscale of the Responses to Intrusions Questionnaire (RRIQ) was used.
Once they engage in such negative ruminative thoughts and sustain damage to these subcortical structures, older PLWH may find it more difficult to initiate an alternative thought that may be more positive.
Nolen-Hoeksema (1991) identified two common responses to depression in individuals: ruminative responses, which involve dwelling on symptoms without attempting to improve symptoms, and distracting responses, which involve turning away from depressive symptoms.
Carruthers there demonstrated how crucial ruminative practices that in the aggregate can be termed memoria were for medieval writers, scribes, illuminators, and readers.
Then look at the prosy, comic ironies of the Blast poems, then the corrosive quatrains of Mauberly, then Propertius, in a long form more ruminative and less explosive.
Nassief was often radiant in these ruminative songs.
Digressive and allusive sketches, rich less with local color than ruminative thought, Travel Pictures shows a poet seeking solace in the simplicity of nature, but who would also forsake the sunrise for the pleasures of coffee in bed.
Aafia Siddiqui "reported depressed mood, anxiety, ruminative thoughts concerning her son's welfare, poor sleep and moderate appetite.
Post-punk" quickly became a term so broad as to be nearly meaningless, and Joy Division's particular brand was unusually dark, ruminative, and at times frankly despairing.
7) The other cognitive vulnerability factor is that of a ruminative thinking style.
In these highly synthetic and ruminative essays, Volkov does an excellent job of sketching out the contradictions and conflicts that plagued the process of acculturation.