ruminate

(redirected from ruminations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

ruminate

(ro͞o′mə-nāt′)
v. rumi·nated, rumi·nating, rumi·nates
v.intr.
1. To turn a matter over and over in the mind.
2. To chew cud.
v.tr.
To reflect on over and over again.

ru′mi·na′tive adj.
ru′mi·na′tive·ly adv.
ru′mi·na′tor n.

ruminate

(of plant parts) appearing chewed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, deliberate rumination mediates the relation between the subjective severity of the event, intrusive rumination, and the development of PTG.
Rumination is a maladaptive process of self-reflection, featuring a hyper-focus on internal distress and the possible causes and consequences of these cognitive-affective experiences (Nolen-Hoeksema, Wisco, & Lyuborsky, 2008).
In other words, rumination may moderate the relationship between intrusions and depressive symptoms.
Offense rumination may be associated with some behavioral regret, but is characterized even more by self-condemnation in misguided efforts to self-atone (Narramore, 1984).
Washington, August 23 (ANI): A new research by Stanford University researchers has provided insights into how rumination is represented in the brain of depressed persons.
Although the concept of troubled ruminations may be important at all stages of the life cycle, we suspect that it is most critical in emerging adulthood.
Language use spans the gamut from vulgar curses to ordinary conversation to intricate and complex ruminations.
Rather, they are "high concept" ruminations about possible dark futures.
To its credit, Comber's thorough abstractness left the door open to imaginative ruminations on the precariousness of shelter, the untamable violence of nature (earthquakes, hurricanes), and destruction's potential as a creative force.
songbird Kate Bush is back with Aerial (Columbia)--sublime ruminations, perfect for your favorite yoga mama.
The stories cover topics from the Mars Opportunity rover, to race and the human genome, to ruminations on robots and recipes.
Author de Brabandere, a partner with the Boston Consulting Group, takes both a historical and philosophical view of the nature of change and how it can be effected, referring to such esteemed figures in philosophy as Heraclites and Francis Bacon, and weaving in a host of ruminations about the nature of learning.