rumination


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rumination

 [roo″mĭ-na´shun]
1. in ruminants, the casting up of food out of the rumen and chewing of it a second time.
2. in humans, the regurgitation of food after almost every meal, part of it being vomited and the rest swallowed; this is sometimes seen in infants (rumination disorder of infancy) and in individuals with mental retardation.
3. persistent meditation on a subject, particularly thinking about and reviewing one's past.
rumination disorder an eating disorder seen in infants under one year of age; after a period of normal eating habits, the child begins excessive regurgitation and rechewing of food, which is then ejected from the mouth or reswallowed; if untreated, death from malnutrition may occur.

ru·mi·na·tion

(rū'mi-nā'shŭn),
1. The physiologic process in ruminant animals in which coarse, hastily eaten food is regurgitated from the rumen, thoroughly rechewed, reduced to finer particles, mixed with saliva, and reswallowed.
2. A disorder of infancy characterized by repeated regurgitation of food, with weight loss or failure to thrive, developing after a period of normal functioning.
3. Periodic reconsideration of the same subject.
[L. ruminatio, fr. rumino, to chew the cud, think over, fr. rumen, throat]

rumination

/ru·mi·na·tion/ (roo″mĭ-na´shun)
1. the casting up of the food to be chewed thoroughly a second time, as in cattle.
2. in humans, the regurgitation of food after almost every meal, part of it being vomited and the rest swallowed: a condition sometimes seen in infants (rumination disorder) or in mentally retarded individuals.

rumination

(ro͞o′mə-nā′shən)
n.
1. The act of thinking about something in a sustained fashion.
2. The act or process of chewing cud.

rumination

[ro̅o̅′minā′shən]
Etymology: L, ruminare, to chew again
habitual regurgitation of small amounts of undigested food with little force after every feeding, a condition commonly seen in infants. It may be a symptom of overfeeding, of eating too fast, or of swallowing air. It has little or no clinical significance. More copious and forceful regurgitation may indicate a more serious condition such as an allergic intestinal reaction, an infectious disease, an obstruction of the intestinal tract, or a metabolic disorder. Also called reflux. See also vomit.

ru·mi·na·tion

(rū'mi-nā'shŭn)
1. The physiologic process in ruminant animals in which coarse, hastily eaten food is regurgitated from the rumen, thoroughly rechewed, reduced to finer particles, mixed with saliva, and reswallowed.
2. A disorder of infancy characterized by repeated regurgitation of food, with weight loss or failure to thrive, developing after a period of normal functioning.
3. Periodic reconsideration of the same subject.
[L. ruminatio, fr. rumino, to chew the cud, think over, fr. rumen, throat]

rumination

Voluntary regurgitation of food from the stomach which is then again chewed and swallowed. Rumination sometimes occurs in mentally disturbed people.

rumination

the chewing of partially digested food, retrieved from the RUMEN by reverse PERISTALSIS.

rumination

includes regurgitation, remastication, ensalivation and reswallowing. The regurgitation of fluid reticular contents occurs as a result of a positive lowering of intrathoracic pressure, the arrival of a ruminal contraction at the cardial sphincter at the appropriate time, relaxation of the cardia and reverse peristalsis in the lower esophagus. The regurgitus is compressed at the back of the tongue and the fluid immediately reswallowed. The solid material is chewed for about a minute and reswallowed. The cycle is then ready to recommence. Rumination requires a positive approach by the cow and it is easily dissuaded by fright or food. Called also chewing the cud, cudding.
References in periodicals archive ?
The feed and rumination efficiencies, expressed as g/h DM and g/h NDF, were obtained by dividing the average daily intakes of DM and NDF by the total time spent eating and/or ruminating in 24 hours, respectively.
The present studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between rumination and intrusions in the prediction of depression.
This condition clearly differed from offense rumination and from repentance, both of which emphasized one's own responsibility for the offense.
Such is the case in depression, where non-productive ruminations are a common and distressing symptom of the disorder.
There is no empirical base for a quantitative definition of rumination, and all such attempts will yield artificial delimitations.
Dry matter and NDF concentrations in each rumination bolus (g) were obtained by dividing the amount of DM and NDF consumed (g/d) in 24 h by the number of daily rumination boli.
Feeding behavior of animal reared under intensive management system includes active intake of concentrate feed and fodder, rumination and drinking.
Intensive Care is Halprin's rumination on mortality.
Miles reflects on the Prince of Denmark's rumination, "to sleep, perchance to dream," as he struggles to keep his vision alive in the midst of the detractors and so-called realists.
Bristling with wit and insouciance, independent filmmaker Ann Marie Fleming's contemporary adaptation of the classical myth of Tiresias is a playful rumination on gender relations, power and sexuality.
In contrast, rumination consists of an intense focus on real or imagined negative events, usually considered to be out of one's control, which in turn seems to amplify anxiety, depression, and social unease.
Following a lengthy period of rumination and maybes, Mexico's state oil company Pemex has announced that it will put $221 million 'seed investment' into the development of 200 petrochemical ventures in 2006.