rumination


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rumination

 [roo″mĭ-na´shun]
1. in ruminants, the casting up of food out of the rumen and chewing of it a second time.
2. in humans, the regurgitation of food after almost every meal, part of it being vomited and the rest swallowed; this is sometimes seen in infants (rumination disorder of infancy) and in individuals with mental retardation.
3. persistent meditation on a subject, particularly thinking about and reviewing one's past.
rumination disorder an eating disorder seen in infants under one year of age; after a period of normal eating habits, the child begins excessive regurgitation and rechewing of food, which is then ejected from the mouth or reswallowed; if untreated, death from malnutrition may occur.

ru·mi·na·tion

(rū'mi-nā'shŭn),
1. The physiologic process in ruminant animals in which coarse, hastily eaten food is regurgitated from the rumen, thoroughly rechewed, reduced to finer particles, mixed with saliva, and reswallowed.
2. A disorder of infancy characterized by repeated regurgitation of food, with weight loss or failure to thrive, developing after a period of normal functioning.
3. Periodic reconsideration of the same subject.
[L. ruminatio, fr. rumino, to chew the cud, think over, fr. rumen, throat]

rumination

/ru·mi·na·tion/ (roo″mĭ-na´shun)
1. the casting up of the food to be chewed thoroughly a second time, as in cattle.
2. in humans, the regurgitation of food after almost every meal, part of it being vomited and the rest swallowed: a condition sometimes seen in infants (rumination disorder) or in mentally retarded individuals.

rumination

(ro͞o′mə-nā′shən)
n.
1. The act of thinking about something in a sustained fashion.
2. The act or process of chewing cud.

rumination

[ro̅o̅′minā′shən]
Etymology: L, ruminare, to chew again
habitual regurgitation of small amounts of undigested food with little force after every feeding, a condition commonly seen in infants. It may be a symptom of overfeeding, of eating too fast, or of swallowing air. It has little or no clinical significance. More copious and forceful regurgitation may indicate a more serious condition such as an allergic intestinal reaction, an infectious disease, an obstruction of the intestinal tract, or a metabolic disorder. Also called reflux. See also vomit.

ru·mi·na·tion

(rū'mi-nā'shŭn)
1. The physiologic process in ruminant animals in which coarse, hastily eaten food is regurgitated from the rumen, thoroughly rechewed, reduced to finer particles, mixed with saliva, and reswallowed.
2. A disorder of infancy characterized by repeated regurgitation of food, with weight loss or failure to thrive, developing after a period of normal functioning.
3. Periodic reconsideration of the same subject.
[L. ruminatio, fr. rumino, to chew the cud, think over, fr. rumen, throat]

rumination

Voluntary regurgitation of food from the stomach which is then again chewed and swallowed. Rumination sometimes occurs in mentally disturbed people.

rumination

the chewing of partially digested food, retrieved from the RUMEN by reverse PERISTALSIS.

rumination

includes regurgitation, remastication, ensalivation and reswallowing. The regurgitation of fluid reticular contents occurs as a result of a positive lowering of intrathoracic pressure, the arrival of a ruminal contraction at the cardial sphincter at the appropriate time, relaxation of the cardia and reverse peristalsis in the lower esophagus. The regurgitus is compressed at the back of the tongue and the fluid immediately reswallowed. The solid material is chewed for about a minute and reswallowed. The cycle is then ready to recommence. Rumination requires a positive approach by the cow and it is easily dissuaded by fright or food. Called also chewing the cud, cudding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rumination has been shown to be linked with adverse psychological tendencies in Indigenous American Indian and Alaskan Native peoples.
Hypothesis 1: Regret will mediate the influence of rumination on depression.
In this study the efficiency in the use of the material ingested through an improvement in the rumination process probably was benefited by the cottonseed cake, a source of effective fiber and protein: energy to the animals.
Previous studies have also shown that resilience behaviors are less likely to occur when individuals engage in rumination while experiencing stress (see Troy & Mauss, 2011).
When self-views get poisoned in response to one's dire conditions self- compassion is thought to be a potential intervention that can generate fruitful results (Neff and McGehee, 2010) for instance lower tendencies for rumination and thought suppression (Neff, Kirkpatrick, and Rude, 2007).
Despite some authors' claim that the associations of negative affect with neuroticism and positive affect with extraversion are so high that they evaluate the same construct under different names (Tellegen and Waller: Exploring personality through test construction: development of the Multi-dimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ), unpublished), our study provides evidence that positive affect, negative affect, extraversion, and neuroticism are differently related to rumination, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress.
The second objective was to confirm the convergent and discriminant validity shown in the original scale, examining the relationships between the Spanish DAQ and related variables, such as trait anger and anger expression, negative and positive affect, personality traits, angry rumination and physical and verbal aggression (Denson et al.
By its very nature too, rumination is antithetical to self-compassion, an important trait in positive psychology.
So when you become trapped in a negative cycle of circular thinking which is prolonged and unhelpful, without reaching a conclusion, rumination has occurred.
Students can now quantify rumination as opposed to just seeing cows chewing their cud, as well as the effects any changes in diet, health and oestrus activity has on rumination.