ruminant


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Related to ruminant: ruminant digestion

ruminant

 [roo´mĭ-nant]
1. chewing the cud.
2. an animal that has a stomach with four complete cavities, and that characteristically regurgitates undigested food from the rumen, the first stomach, and masticates it when at rest.

ru·mi·nant

(rū'mi-nănt),
An animal that chews the cud, material regurgitated from the rumen for rechewing; for example, the sheep, cow, deer, or antelope.

ruminant

/ru·mi·nant/ (roo´mĭ-nant)
1. chewing the cud.
2. one of the order of animals, including cattle, sheep, goats, deer, and antelopes, which have a stomach with four complete cavities (rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum), through which the food passes in digestion.

ruminant

(ro͞o′mə-nənt)
n.
1. Any of various hoofed, even-toed, usually horned mammals of the suborder Ruminantia, such as cattle, sheep, deer, antelopes, and giraffes, characteristically having a stomach divided into four compartments and chewing a cud that consists of plant food that is regurgitated when partially digested.
2. Any of various animals that ruminate but are not in the Ruminantia, including camels, alpacas, and llamas.
adj.
1. Characterized by the chewing of cud.
2. Of or belonging to the Ruminantia.
3. Meditative; contemplative.

ruminant

[ro̅o̅′minənt]
Etymology: L, ruminare, to chew again
pertaining to animals that chew their cud and to human infants that may regurgitate and reswallow a meal.

ruminant

any mammal of the suborder Pecora, (deer, giraffes, antelopes, sheep, goats, cows) of the order ARTIODACTYLA. They usually possess horns in the males, lack incisors in the upper jaw and have a four-compartmented stomach which includes the RUMEN, from which they regurgitate food in order to chew it.

ruminant

1. member of the mammalian suborder Ruminantia.
2. an animal that has a stomach with four complete cavities, and that characteristically regurgitates undigested food from the rumen and masticates it when at rest.

ruminant forestomach
ruminant ketosis
see pregnancy toxemia, acetonemia.
ruminant stomachs
include the forestomach (reticulum, rumen, omasum) and abomasum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), also named pseudo-peste bovine is a highly contagious viral disease, mainly infecting small ruminants.
Although PPRV-associated outbreaks among these ruminants have been suspected since 2000, the virus was not isolated or characterized at that time.
Evidence of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) infection in Sindh Ibex (Capra aegagrus blythi) in Pakistan as confirmed by detection of antigen and antibody.
1991) who reported reduced fiber digestion by ruminants fed diets containing higher RUP.
Productive and economic performance of small ruminant production in two production system of the highlands of Ethiopia.
So, only a few species appear to be responsible for all the methane produced by ruminants everywhere, which means mitigation strategies can be developed to target the few dominant methanogens, " he said.
Small ruminants are socioeconomically important livestock species, ubiquitously reared as primary source of animal food and more than five million households in the country are engaged in rearing of small ruminants.
Trading small ruminants at market places, where animals from different locations and sources are brought into close contact with one another, also promotes PPRV transmission.
Ruminants fed tropical forages produce more CH4 than those fed temperate ones.
This unique attribute means that ruminants play a vital role in terms of providing enough safe and nutritious food to feed the world's growing human population.
Xun Xu, Deputy Director of BGI, said, "The goat reference genome is an important stepping stone in the molecular breeding of cashmere goats, and will help to advance the comparative studies on ruminants.
The other small ruminant, goats, are considered separately when there is a difference.