rugosity


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rugosity

 [roo-gos´ĭ-te]
1. the condition of being rugose.
2. a fold, wrinkle, or ruga.

ru·gos·i·ty

(rū-gos'i-tē),
1. The state of being thrown into folds or wrinkles.
2. A ruga.

rugosity

/ru·gos·i·ty/ (roo-gos´ĭ-te)
1. a condition of being rugose.
2. a fold, wrinkle, or ruga.

ru·gos·i·ty

(rū-gos'i-tē)
1. The state of being thrown into folds or wrinkles.
2. A ruga.

rugosity

1. the condition of being rugose.
2. a fold, wrinkle or ruga.
References in periodicals archive ?
Site effects were not found for mean surface rugosity of shell-only treatments, nor for native oyster treatments (Fig.
The introduction of forced vibrations during cutting thermo, operation has as effect the lowering of rugosity of the cutting surfaces, important fact for the structures submitted of tiredness.
T6 with fine rugosity and 10 setae in punctures that are not quite as deep.
b], as well as measures of non-Rayleigh distribution of the backscatter and the seafloor rugosity (roughness) derived from bathymetric soundings, in an attempt to discriminate between trawlable and untrawlable seafloors.
1998) and recruitment (Ebert 1983, Balch & Scheibling 2000) patterns are two of the main studied mechanisms, whereas for the latter, differences in turbulence, wave action, substrate rugosity, and heterogeneity are factors routinely advocated to influence the effect of sea urchin grazing over algal assemblages (Lawrence 2001).
It is used the following notations in relation (8): [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]--investment in pumping station; k--equivalent absolute rugosity of pipe; n--revolution of pump; [W.
Along with Nacurrie (Brown 1994) and Cohuna (Macintosh 1953), remains from these two sites share similarities in size, shape, rugosity and head-shaping, leading to assumptions of similarity in time.
other shelter-providing urchins, substrate rugosity, or foliose algae, is available (Tegner and Dayton, 1981).
Rugosity was measured by the chain-and-tape technique (Wilding et al.
Finally, even if the physical origin of the parameters is difficult to find, we assume that r is linked to the extinction coefficient of the composite d is the sample thickness and t is related to diffusion or surface rugosity.
Fish species richness is highly dependent on the rugosity and variety of growth forms in the habitat, whereas the height of vertical structures is an important predictor of total fish abundance (Gratwicke and Speight, 2005).