rudiment


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rudiment

 [roo´dĭ-ment]
1. an organ or part having little or no function but which has functioned at an earlier stage in the same individual or in his ancestors.

ru·di·ment

(rū'di-ment),
1. An organ or structure that is incompletely developed.
2. The first indication of a structure in the course of ontogeny.
Synonym(s): rudimentum
[L. rudimentum, a beginning, fr. rudis, unformed]

rudiment

/ru·di·ment/ (roo´dĭ-ment)
1. a structure that has remained undeveloped, or one with little or no function at present but which was functionally developed earlier.

rudiment

(ro͞o′də-mənt)
n.
Biology An imperfectly or incompletely developed organ or part.

ru′di·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.

rudiment

[ro̅o̅′dimənt]
Etymology: L, rudimentum, beginning
an organ or tissue that is incompletely developed or nonfunctional. rudimentary, adj.

ru·di·ment

(rū'di-mĕnt)
1. An organ or structure that is incompletely developed.
2. The first indication of a structure in the course of ontogeny.
Synonym(s): rudimentum.
[L. rudimentum, a beginning, fr. rudis, unformed]

ru·di·ment

(rū'di-mĕnt)
Organ or structure that is incompletely developed.
[L. rudimentum, a beginning, fr. rudis, unformed]

rudiment

1. primordium.
2. an organ or part that has failed to realize its potential function.
References in classic literature ?
Here we are teaching men and women the rudiments of agriculture.
Having taught Numa the rudiments of being driven, he now urged him forward and there commenced as strange a journey as the unrecorded history of the jungle contains.
The professor had been engaged in taking careful measurements of the head of his latest experiment, the while he coached the young man in the first rudiments of spoken language, and now the subject of his labors found himself suddenly deserted and alone.
He even commenced to acquire the rudiments of their language under the pleasant tutorage of the brown-eyed girl.
It was about studies and lessons, dealing with the rudiments of knowledge, and the schoolboyish tone of it conflicted with the big things that were stirring in him - with the grip upon life that was even then crooking his fingers like eagle's talons, with the cosmic thrills that made him ache, and with the inchoate consciousness of mastery of it all.
But first I mean To exercise him in the Wilderness; There he shall first lay down the rudiments Of his great warfare, ere I send him forth To conquer Sin and Death, the two grand foes.
Yet he possessed his soul with patience, and during this time of his torment, when Hadly, who had been brought for the purpose from Illinois, made him over into another man* he revolved great plans in his head for the organization of the learned proletariat, and for the maintenance of at least the rudiments of education amongst the people of the abyss--all this of course in the event of the First Revolt being a failure.
These must have at least the rudiments of civilized government since they recognized one among them as ruler, with the title, king.
He said, the present occasion would put to the test those excellent rudiments which he had learnt from Mr Thwackum and Mr Square; and it would be entirely owing to them, if he was enabled to survive such misfortunes.
Nevertheless I think it is my duty to see that you are properly instructed in at least the rudiments of music.
Ye have some rudiments of sense," said Alan, grimly.
There is a brief chapter on snare drum rudiments and rudimental drumming, much of which is taken up simply with lists of rudiment names.