rubeosis

rubeosis

 [roo″be-o´sis]
redness.
rubeosis i´ridis a condition characterized by a new formation of vessels and connective tissue on the surface of the iris, frequently seen in diabetics.

ru·be·o·sis

(rū'bē-ō'sis),
Reddish discoloration, as of the skin.
[L. ruber, red, + G. -osis, condition]

rubeosis

/ru·be·o·sis/ (roo″be-o´sis) redness.
rubeosis i´ridis  a condition characterized by a new formation of vessels and connective tissue on the surface of the iris, frequently seen in diabetics.

rubeosis

[ro̅o̅′bē·ō′sis]
a red discoloration of the skin.

ru·be·o·sis

(rū'bē-ō'sis)
1. Reddish discoloration, as of the skin.
2. Neovascularization of the iris seen in ocular ischemic diseases.
[L. ruber, red, + G. -osis, condition]

rubeosis

redness.

rubeosis iridis
a condition characterized by a new formation of vessels and connective tissue on the surface of the iris.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ophthalmic examination OS revealed raised intraocular pressure (37 mm Hg; reference interval 7-16 mm Hg), mydriasis, conjunctival and episcleral hyperemia, shallow anterior chamber due to anterior displacement of the lens and iris, rubeosis iridis, and engorgement of the pecten.
Table 1 Some causes of facial erythema Atopic eczema Seborrhoeic eczema Sebopsoriasis Allergic contact dermatitis Irritant dermatitis Photocontact dermatitis Rosacea Lichen planus Lichen planus actinicus Carcinoid Glutamate sensitivity Table 1 Some causes of facial erythema Diabetic rubeosis Topical steroids Alcohol flush 'Weather beating' Mitral stenosis Poikiloderma Rothmund-Thomsen Sarcoid Lupus erythematosus Dermatomyositis Pemphigus foliaceus Erysipelas Hansenosis Lymphoma Haemangioendothelioma Keratosis rubra faciei of Brocq Ulerythema ophryogenes Erythrose peribuccale of Brocq Riehl's melanosis Perioral dermatitis Erythromelanosis faciei et colli
This is because rubeosis is usually/ a consequence of some other advanced, or significant ocular pathology, which has caused retinal ischaemia.
Complications include secondary cataract, iris rubeosis, uveitis, secondary glaucoma and, eventually, phthisis bulbi.
In people with diabetes, and those with suspected previous vascular occlusion, you should examine the iris carefully for evidence of rubeosis iridis prior to dilatation of the pupil.
Neovascularisation of the iris (NVI), also known as rubeosis iridis, occurs when new blood vessels are created from preexisting iris capillaries found near the pupillary margin (Figure 1) (10) and iris root.
Complications include secondary cataract, rubeosis iridis, uveitis, secondary glaucoma, retinal detachment and phthisis bulbi (atrophy of non-functional eye).
One such factor, found in elevated concentration in the aqueous humour of patients with rubeosis and NVG, is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).
Rubeosis iridis (NVI) may subsequently lead to the development of neovascular glaucoma.
In addition, the retinal ischaemia drives the development of rubeosis iridis.
The anterior segment may also provide additional evidence to help confirm the diagnosis such as rubeosis in the case of a diabetic presenting with a vitreous haemorrhage.