rubefacient


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Related to rubefacient: rubescent, vulnerary

rubefacient

 [roo″bĕ-fa´shent]
1. reddening the skin by producing local vasodilation with hyperemia.
2. an agent that so acts.

ru·be·fa·cient

(rū'bē-fā'shĕnt),
1. Causing a reddening of the skin.
2. A counterirritant that produces erythema when applied to the skin surface.
[L. rubi-facio, fr. ruber, red, + facio, to make]

rubefacient

/ru·be·fa·cient/ (roo″bĕ-fa´shunt)
1. reddening the skin by producing hyperemia.
2. an agent that so acts.

rubefacient

(ro͞o′bə-fā′shənt)
adj.
Producing redness, as of the skin.
n.
A substance that irritates the skin, causing redness.

ru′be·fac′tion (-făk′shən) n.

rubefacient

[ro̅o̅′bəfā′shənt]
Etymology: L, ruber, red, facere, to make
1 n, a substance or agent that increases the reddish coloration of the skin.
2 adj, increasing the reddish coloration of the skin.

ru·be·fa·cient

(rū'bĕ-fā'shĕnt)
1. Causing a reddening of the skin.
2. A counterirritant that produces erythema when applied to the skin surface.
[L. rubi-facio, fr. ruber, red, + facio, to make]

rubefacient

Any substance that reddens the skin by dilating the skin blood vessels. Rubefacients are sometimes included in liniments but are of little medical value.

rubefacient (rōōˈ·b·fāˑ·shnt),

n an herb or substance used to bring blood rapidly to a concentrated area of the skin, thus causing redness of skin.

ru·be·fa·cient

(rū'bĕ-fā'shĕnt)
1. Causing a reddening of the skin.
2. A counterirritant that produces erythema when applied to the skin surface.
[L. rubi-facio, fr. ruber, red, + facio, to make]

rubefacient,

n a substance or agent that increases the reddish coloration of the skin.

rubefacient

1. reddening the skin.
2. an agent that reddens the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to background information in the report, rubefacients cause irritation and reddening of the skin, due to increased blood flow.
Rubefacients (heat rubs such as oil of wintergreen) are a class of therapeutic topical treatments known as counterirritants.
Lead researcher Dr Andrew Moore, of the Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics at the University of Oxford, said: "When it comes to rubefacients they do not work well enough to take any notice of them.
anti acne, anti inflammatory, anti purities, anti fungal, rubefacients, etc.
Vincent says the products work by acting as rubefacients, or "counter irritants" which suppress muscle discomfort caused by physical activity.
Topical rubefacients for acute and chronic pain in adults 90