rote learning


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rote learn·ing

the learning of arbitrary relationships, usually by repetition of the learning procedure through memorization and without an understanding of the relationships.

rote learn·ing

(rōt lĕrn'ing)
The learning of arbitrary relationships, usually by repetition of the learning procedure through memorization and without an understanding of the relationships.
References in periodicals archive ?
Negative teaching examples were characterized, across the levels of schooling, as rigid and objectivist, with rote learning typically named as problematic along with lockstep instruction.
The idea is to do away with rote learning and improve students' ability to understand and apply concepts.
Without them, students never transition from rote learning to critical thinking.
Students who felt competent; were intrinsically motivated; used skills like summarizing, explaining, and making connections to other materials; and avoided rote learning showed more growth in math achievement than those who didn't.
This makes three false assumptions: first, that students already somehow possess mathematical insight, prior to actually training in it; second, that rote learning is somehow an obstacle to mathematical insight; and third, that students hate repetitive drill.
He also lauded AKU-EB for focussing on learning based on understanding of concepts and utilizing application-based assessments in an effort to do away with rote learning.
Most of her time in Peru was spent teaching children as well as adults, Education, she said, is key to any kind of human development, and it is much more than just rote learning.
Montreal), and constructivism has been thought the best approach to replace the rote learning of the native culture with the higher cognitive skills of the West.
In fact, the kind of dedication to rote learning espoused in Battle Hymn is absent at America's top law schools, where time is spent instead honing creative thinking and critical reasoning skills.
The aim of this agreement is to improve upon traditional education in the Arab world, which is typically based on memorisation and rote learning.
Pupils experienced a typical lesson involving rote learning, copying, handwriting and were also told about the strict discipline that was delivered in school rooms.