rotablation

rotablation

/ro·tab·la·tion/ (ro″tab-la´shun) an atherectomy technique in which a rotating bur is inserted through a catheter into an artery; the burr rotates and debulks atherosclerotic plaque.

rotoblation

, rotablation, rotoablation (rōt″ŏ-blā′shŏn, rōt″ă-, rōt″ō-a-blā′) [ rot(ate) + ablation]
Drilling through the core of a plaque obstructing a blood vessel to improve blood flow to the organ supplied by the vessel; rotational atherectomy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The procedure is called coronary rotablation and is an advanced technique for treating very resistant, hardened, calci-fied narrowings in blood vessels that can be unresponsive to methods where a balloon is inserted into the artery to open it open.
Because of the age of the coronary thrombus, fibrinolytic deficit, and the presence of other factors resisting thrombolysis, other options--such as PTCA, rotablation, and stenting--must be used.
Coronary atherectomy, commonly referred to as rotablation, is a catheter-based procedure that includes a high-speed rotating metallic burr that abrades calcified (hardened) plaque that is blocking an artery and blood supply to the heart, rotating at speeds of up to 200,000 RPM.
A first attempt to get a balloon and stent through was unsuccessful so rotablation became the only option.
Coronary atherectomy or commonly referred to as rotablation, is a catheter-based procedure that includes a high-speed rotating metallic burr that abrades calcified (hardened) plaque that is blocking an artery and blood supply to the heart, rotating at speeds of up to 200,000 RPM.