rose hips


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rose hips

the fruit or berries from wild rose bushes and in particular Rosa canina, R. gallica, R. condita, and R. rugosa, (family Rosaceae). A rich source of vitamin C (ascorbic acid).
Synonym(s): hipberries

rose hips

an herbal product taken from a plant native to Europe and Asia, now grown widely in North America.
uses It is used as a source of vitamin C and as a treatment for colds, fever, and mild infections. Much of vitamin C is, however, reportedly destroyed during the typical drying processes and storage of rose hips, and there are insufficient reliable data regarding efficacy for any of its uses.
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy and lactation or in people with known hypersensitivity to this plant.

rose hips,

n Latin name:
Rosa canina; part used: hips (fruits); uses: diuretic, antioxidant, source of vitamin C, kidney and urinary disorders, arthritis, rheumatism, gout, scurvy, sciatica; precautions: pregnancy, lactation. Also called
dog brier fruit, dog rose fruit, hipberries, wild brier berries, brier hip, hip, brier rose, eglantine gall, hog seed, dog berry, sweet brier, witches brier, hip tree, hip fruit, or
hop fruit.
References in periodicals archive ?
In one clinical study, rose hip extract was shown to reduce joint pain and stiffness in up to 82% of people.
Rose hips are long lasting - they will last for 3-4 weeks indoors and keeping them outdoors or in a cool spot they could last even longer.
Dried rose hips can be ground in a coffee grinder and added at the rate of 1/2 to 1 teaspoon powdered rose hips per cup of food.
Contemporary Charm: Balsam, boxwood, miniature lotus pods, native fern painted gold, and rose hips.
Rose hips and in particular those of dog rose (Rosa canina L, Rosaceae) have traditionally been used for the prevention and therapy of infections, and inflammatory diseases (Kharazmi and Winther 1999; Winther et al.
After three months, evidence from the trial suggested that taking rose hips significantly improved both joint stiffness and movement, and reduced the frequency that participants needed to take painkillers.
Every morning I walked to a local farm to collect milk and in the autumn my mother and I would collect rose hips, for which we were paid 1d a pound.
Since time immemorial, rose hips have been used for food.
Pixie pears is in fact another name for rose hips - also called pigs' noses, nippernails and hedge-pedgies.
Rose hips have long been a popular fruit in Scandinavia for their vitamin C content, he said.
Bell, the lone paid employee, who sometimes hand-feeds the apes, also brings them roses - for the nutrition contained in the rose hips.