root resorption


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root re·sorp·tion

dissolution of the root of a tooth; either external, with loss or blunting of the apical portion, or internal, with loss of dentin from the inside (pulpal) part of the root area.

root re·sorp·tion

(rūt rĕ-sōrpshŭn)
Dissolution of tooth root; either external, with loss or blunting of apical portion, or internal, with loss of dentin from inside (pulpal) part of root area.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Rapid palatal expansion Root resorption Herba Epimedii Icariin Osteoclast RANKL 0PG
At 6 months follow-up, one tooth demonstrated external root resorption in the FC group.
Identification of factors associated with pathological root resorption in traumatized primary teeth.
Follow-up: Four year radiographic review shows signs of arrested replacement root resorption, but the auto-transplant has been left in-situ as it continues to have satisfactory aesthetics and occlusion.
Teeth with radiographic evidence of root resorption or bone loss were excluded from the study.
When this interproximal reduction is done on the second primary molar, the clinician should not challenge the pulp horns by excessive reduction, as this may cause pulpal inflammation and could stimulate premature root resorption.
Root resorption was detected in almost one third of the teeth.
The longterm use of calcium hydroxide is more effective than shortterm treatment for established inflammatory root resorption [Trope et al, 1995].
One of these was a RCT with a slightly larger sample size showing MTA molars (0/43) were significantly less likely to show pathologic root resorption than FC molars (6/57) [Aeinehchi et al.
The decision whether or not to instigate treatment is based on the age of the patient, the degree and extent of the IO, the amount of root resorption, the severity of tilting of neighbouring teeth and the presence and location of the permanent successor.
Results: Group I: in 5 patients severe root resorption occurred before crown formation of the permanent successor was completed.
At the end of the follow up period the treatment was considered as a failure if one or more of the following were present: history of continuous and persistent pain, swelling, sinus tract, tenderness to percussion, and radiographic evidence of periradicular or furcal pathosis or root resorption.