rogue

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rogue

  1. an unwanted individual, particularly a plant in a crop, that is usually removed during a breeding programme.
  2. an animal (particularly one of vicious character) that has separated from the main group and leads a solitary life.
References in classic literature ?
And now the Emperor, with all the grandees of his court, came to the weavers; and the rogues raised their arms, as if in the act of holding something up, saying, "Here are your Majesty's trousers
The Emperor was accordingly undressed, and the rogues pretended to array him in his new suit; the Emperor turning round, from side to side, before the looking glass.
One of these authors," says another writer, "(the fellow that was pilloried, I have forgotten his name), is indeed so grave, sententious, dogmatical a rogue that there is no enduring him.
Partridge certainly saw it in that light; for he testified much dissatisfaction on the occasion, quoted an old proverb, and said, he should not wonder if the rogue attacked them again before they reached London.
The Rogue may surely claim two merits, at least, in the eyes of the new generation--he is never serious for two moments together; and he "doesn't take long to read.
Through Siskiyou County and across high mountains, they came to Ashland and Medford and camped beside the wild Rogue River.
Nope, it ain't the valley of the moon," agreed Billy, and he said it on the evening of the day he hooked a monster steelhead, standing to his neck in the ice-cold water of the Rogue and fighting for forty minutes, with screaming reel, ere he drew his finny prize to the bank and with the scalp-yell of a Comanche jumped and clutched it by the gills.
The Rogue had got the clue he wanted, though he held it with a clumsy hand.
You shall put it plain if you want it answered,' thought the Rogue, doggedly; 'I ain't a-going a wolunteering.
The rogue, like the artist and perhaps the gentleman, belongs to no class.
By my faith, brother," said he of the Grove, "my stomach is not made for thistles, or wild pears, or roots of the woods; let our masters do as they like, with their chivalry notions and laws, and eat what those enjoin; I carry my prog-basket and this bota hanging to the saddle-bow, whatever they may say; and it is such an object of worship with me, and I love it so, that there is hardly a moment but I am kissing and embracing it over and over again;" and so saying he thrust it into Sancho's hands, who raising it aloft pointed to his mouth, gazed at the stars for a quarter of an hour; and when he had done drinking let his head fall on one side, and giving a deep sigh, exclaimed, "Ah, whoreson rogue, how catholic it is
Rogues tend not to have a plan, even at the most elementary level.