rivalry

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rivalry

 [ri´val-re]
a state of competition or antagonism.
sibling rivalry competition between siblings for the love, affection, and attention of one or both parents or for other recognition or gain.

ri·val·ry

(rī'văl-rē),
Competition between two or more individuals or entities for the same object or goal.
[L. rivalis, competitor, rival]

rivalry

/ri·val·ry/ (ri´vul-re) a state of competition or antagonism.
sibling rivalry  competition between siblings for the love, affection, and attention of one or both parents or for other recognition or gain.

ri·val·ry

(rī'văl-rē)
Competition between two or more people for the same object or goal.
[L. rivalis, competitor, rival]
References in periodicals archive ?
as the degree of rivalrous feelings by A toward B and denote it by rAB.
In the case of congested, rivalrous local public goods like these, it does make sense to exclude some people from enjoying them in any particular location.
6) Overuse or unrestrained competition in use of the space creates conditions which begin to mimic the type of commons problem that Hardin wrote about--that is, such resources become rivalrous and prone to degradation and perhaps destruction.
as more people join, and thus are the antithesis of rivalrous.
diagnosis that politics is implicitly rivalrous and that the artist
It is quite the opposite, in fact: given the rivalrous nature of their relationship, what Anselmo wants to see is Lotario's failure to make love to his wife, a defeat that will simultaneously affirm Anselmo's superiority and prove the absurdity of Lotario's claims that he should stay away from their home out of propriety.
Numerous scholars, building on Girard's thought, are exploring envy and rivalrous affections for their power to illumine certain doctrines.
Litigation in all legal systems is rivalrous, given opposed interests on litigation outcome.
These items are described as rivalrous and interconnected.
Lewis' novelistic retelling of the myth of Cupid and Psyche, however, provides a bridge: it depicts an ancient society organized around sacrifice and myth as understood in Girard's cultural theory and tells a Girardian story of conversion, in which the narrator discovers the imitative and rivalrous nature of her desire.
Like personal property, virtual items are rivalrous goods.
This kind of rivalrous grandiosity was a sign that, as Heilman and Friedman write, the Rebbe came to "see himself as controlling events not only in Israel but also in many other places in the world.