rite of passage


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rite of passage

n. pl. rites of passage
A ritual or ceremony signifying an event in a person's life indicative of a transition from one stage to another, as from adolescence to adulthood.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Rite of Passage is a good selection for the home and public library, the school library and High School English Teacher classroom library, the book will make a nice Teacher gift for beginning and ending of the school year.
Assisting the new mother in her journey through this rite of passage will set the foundation for successful transition through post-partum issues, taking on the role of "Mother", parenting demands, and an adjustment in her relationship to the father of the child.
Rite of Passage and Pat Smullen (right) win the Gold Cup from Age of Aquarius and Johnny Murtagh at Royal Ascot Picture:
At Connecticut's Weston High School, in a small town where cars rule and pedestrians are in danger, the most important rite of passage is getting a driver's license.
A girl's first diet has definitely become [an] addition to a girl's rite of passage into womanhood.
The lifemask is a rite of passage for all recipients of the award.
Hospitals have also gradually become the places where most of the population are born and many die, yet it took a great deal of protest -- mainly from women in the 1970s and '80s -- to turn the maternity hospital from an emergency ward into a place fit to celebrate a rite of passage, a normal birth being no sickness but a joy.
I wanted my natural birth to hold on to the mystery and power of that singular rite of passage.
Drawing on Turner's notion of communitas, Teather suggests that such liminality exists in spaces where people celebrate rites of passage which `for the contemporary citizen in a wealthy post-modern society, [can be seen as] a process of personal transformation, sometimes revelatory, sometimes agonising, sometimes fun, sometimes requiring a prolonged period of preparation of endurance more like a campaign than a rite of passage, sometimes a lonely, personal experience but sometimes one experienced in the company of another or others' (p.
A recent report from the Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, the prohibitionist propaganda mill headed by former Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Joseph Califano, is titled "Non-Medical Marijuana: Rite of Passage or Russian Roulette?
The separation from family during military service was long a more significant rite of passage for upper-class youth than for working-class counterparts, Loriga argues, because the latter often left home for work at an early age.
The vehicle she advocates for bringing this about is a public, even quasi-ceremonial rite of passage from girlhood to womanhood, in which adult women teach their younger counterparts technical sex information -- which would include an emphasis on "petting" -- in return for promises to postpone intercourse until they feel safe and ready, never to have sex without being fully conscious, or to use sex to get love, status, or money.