rite of passage


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rite of passage

n. pl. rites of passage
A ritual or ceremony signifying an event in a person's life indicative of a transition from one stage to another, as from adolescence to adulthood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rite of Passage and Pat Smullen (right) win the Gold Cup from Age of Aquarius and Johnny Murtagh at Royal Ascot Picture:
In the past, it has been a rite of passage for our nation's leaders to serve in the armed forces.
Broken down into its most basic elements, a rite of passage involves (1) a separation from society, (2) preparation or instruction from an elder, (3) a transition (in the case of adolescence, from child to adult), and (4) a welcoming back into society with acknowledgement of the adolescent's changed status.
As a time-honored tradition, The Nutcracker has become an important rite of passage for local children and families.
RITE Of PASSAGE is on track for another crack at the ascot gold Cup following a workout after racing on Monday at the Curragh, writes Johnny Ward.
Dermot Weld's Rite Of Passage against Aidan O'Brien's Fame and Glory.
ORIGINAL ante -post favourite Rite Of Passage will miss Saturday's Irish Field St Leger at the Curragh.
Share a wonderful experience with a young girl as she goes through a rite of passage in her quinceanera on page 7.
In Bullock, Mississippi, lynching is a rite of passage for all 13-year-old white boys, until an unexpected force halts--if only temporarily--the cycle of killing.
Stravinsky's Rite of Spring is a frequently self-imposed rite of passage for choreographers.
The centerpiece of the Rite of Passage Program is a vocational program with a curriculum based on real life learning.
As a mother of two other children who had experienced this Roman Catholic rite of passage just five and eight years, respectively, before, I was astonished and appalled at how First Communions, for Emily's generation, had suddenly become a commercial three-ring circus.